Jerry Lee Lewis – What’s Made Milwaukee Famous (Has Made a Loser Out of Me)

The title alone made me want to listen to this song. This song went to #2 in the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles chart and #1 in the Canadian Country Charts in 1968. Rod Stewart also made a great cover of this song. The Stewart version is the one I listen to the most but I like both versions.

From Songfacts.

Jerry Lee Lewis took the song to #94  in the Billboard 100 in 1968, but that’s the only version of the song to chart in that country. Rod Stewart’s 1972 rendition was a much bigger hit in the UK, even though the song is very American in its subject matter.

This was written by Glen Sutton, who was the first husband of country singer Lynn Anderson. They married in 1968 and divorced in 1977. Anderson recorded a version on her 1971 album How Can I Unlove You.

 

 

It’s late and she is waiting, and I know I must go home,
But every time I start to leave, they play another song,
Then someone buys another round and whatever drinks are free,
What made Milwaukee famous has made a loser out of me.

Baby’s begged me not to go, so many times before,
She said love and happiness can’t live behind those swingin’ doors,
Now she’s gone and I’m to blame, too late I finally see,
What made Milwaukee famous has made a loser out of me.

Baby’s begged me not to go, so many times before,
She said love and happiness can’t live behind those swingin’ doors,
Now she’s gone and I’m to blame, too late I finally see,
What made Milwaukee famous has made a loser out of me.

What made Milwaukee famous has made a loser out of me,
What made Milwaukee famous has made a loser out of me.
What made Milwaukee famous has made a loser out of me.

 

8-Track Tapes

I  had a stereo that had a record-able 8-track system built in. I would record straight off the radio to the 8-track and from records. I will add that it could be a miserable format to listen to music. If you had a favorite song that you wanted to hear a couple times in a row…get ready to wait till it came back around and then for the infamous “click” and you would switch tracks…and either wait some more or miss the beginning.

But there is more… you may be listening to a song and suddenly the song fades out for a while because it’s too long for the track and then finally the “click” and it finishes out on the next track.

William Powell Lear, the man behind LearJet, was also the inventor of the 8-track cartridge tape system. In 1964 William Lear convinced Ford to install the 8-track in their cars.

In September 1965, Ford Motor Company offered 8-track players as an option in their 1966 model cars.  A Ford spokesperson reported that 65,000 players were installed in the first year.  As a result of the popularity, the 8-track player soon became standard in all Ford cars.

In 1966 home units and portable units were offered. Now people could share their tapes with each other. The peak years of the eight-track were 1967 through 1975. Then, improvements in the tape quality of smaller cassettes and decreasing quality in eight-tracks led consumers away from the eight-track tape.

The last official release on 8-track was Fleetwood Mac’s Greatest Hits in 1988. By then though Compact Disc had taken over the market.

I did have quite a collection of official 8-tracks and self-made 8-tracks. I also have an old 8-track system in my closet…hey you never know.

This video is a must. It shows an Eight Track Museum. It is interesting.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8-track_tape

 

 

CB Radio

Before chat rooms, My Space, Facebook, cell phones, WordPress, or messenger we had CB Radio. In the 1970’s this fad took off.

When Al Gross invented the CB radio in 1945, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) quickly opened up radio services for personal users of the radio. in the 1960s businesses and hobbyist used the radio frequently.

In the early 1970s, the oil crisis caused gas to go up in price and the speed limit dropped to 55 mph. It was then people realized that CB’s could be used to spread the word about what gas stations had gas and what speed traps were set up ahead. Not only truckers were using the CB but it had caught on as a fad.

Movies such as Smokey and the Bandit helped popularize it more and also songs such as Convoy.

As a kid, I remember cars having the CB antennas and people at home. Everyone was getting into the game. People used CB slang and nicknames. Even The First Lady, Betty Ford, was on as “First Mama”…yea some cringe-worthy moments.

CB radio is still used today but the popularity is not like it was through the 70s and 80s… 10-4 (I just had to add that)

The Spinners – The Rubberband Man

I had this single in the late seventies. I bought it at the dime store in a discount rack for 10 cents. I didn’t know what I was buying but it was the best dime I ever spent. The song has had a resurgence in popularity recently with the Guardians of the Galaxy soundtrack.

The Rubberband Man peaked at #2 in the Billboard 100, #2 in Canada and #16 in the UK in 1976. The Spinners had 7 top ten hits and one #1 with Then Came You. Once you hear it…it sticks with you.

From Songfacts.

The Spinners’ producer, Thom Bell, wrote this song for his son with help from his songwriting partner Linda Creed. Bell wrote theme songs for all of his children, although this is the only one that was ever recorded. At first, it was called “The Fat Man,” since his son Mark was rather large, and that’s what his schoolmates called him. Bell wanted to change the perception of this nickname, so he wrote a song about a big man who can really move. He’s the guy everyone waits for at the party, since when he arrives, it can really get going. Said Bell, “It was written for big people who were hip, to change the whole idea of a person being large being sloppy, slow.”

The Rubberman Man

Hand me down my walkin’ cane
Hand me down my hat
Hurry now and don’t be late
‘Cause we ain’t got time to chat
You and me we’re goin’ out
To catch the latest sounds
Guaranteed to blow your mind
So high you won’t come down

Hey, y’all prepare yourself
For the rubberband man
You never heard a sound
Like the rubberband man
You’re bound to lose control
When the rubberband starts to jam

Oh, Lord this dude is outta sight
Everything he does
Seems to come out right

Once I went to hear them play
At a club outside of town
I was so surprised, I was hypnotized
By the sound this cat’s puttin’ down
When I saw this short fat guy
Stretched a band between his toes
Hey, I laughed so hard ’cause the man got down
When he finally reached his goal

Hey, y’all prepare yourself
For the rubberband man
You never heard a sound
Like the rubberband man
You’re bound to lose control
When the rubberband starts to jam

Got that rubberband
Up on his toes
And then he wriggled it up
All around his nose

Guaranteed to blow your mind
Playin’ all that music, yet keepin’ time
Where in the world did he learn that, oh, Lord
Lord, help him get away

Hey, y’all prepare yourself
For the rubberband man
You never heard a sound
Like the rubberband man
You’re bound to lose control
When the rubberband starts to jam

Rubberband man, rubberband man
How much of this stuff do he think we can stand
So much rhythm, grace and debonair from one man, Lord
And then he had the nerve to wiggle his left toe
To his knee, got the feelin’ in his head, y’all
Ah, come on baby

Hey, y’all prepare yourself
For the rubberband man
You never heard a sound
Like the rubberband man
You’re bound to lose control (and he likes to jam)
When the rubberband starts to jam

Rubberband man starts to jam
Movin’ up and down across the land
Got people all in his ways
Everything about him seems out of place
Just a movin’, just a movin’, just a move-move-movin’
Just a, a rubberband, rubberband man
Just a movin’, just a movin’, just a move-move-movin’
Just a rubberband, rubberband man

Get down
Oh, get down lover
Uh-huh

George Harrison – Crackerbox Palace

I first saw the video of this song on television in the seventies. I might have seen it on the SNL broadcast…probably a repeat. A good catchy song by George off of his Thirty Three & 1/3 album. The song peaked at #19 in the Billboard 100 and #19 in Canada.

The album peaked at #11 in the Billboard 200 and #10 in Canada.

From Songfacts.

In the music video, future Rutle Neil Innes played the nurse pushing George in a pram. George’s future wife Olivia Arias played one of the scantily dressed women standing next to his bed.
This song was inspired by Friar Park, a 120 room neo-Gothic mansion that Harrison lived in from 1970, until his death in 2001. The song’s title was Harrison’s nickname for his home.
Harrison’s line “It’s twoo, it’s twoo” was lifted from the movie Blazing Saddles. It was a line spoken by Madeline Kahn about what she had heard about black men. George loved offbeat comedies like that.

Crackerbox Palace

I was so young when I was born
My eyes could not yet see
And by the time of my first dawn
Somebody holding me . . . they said

I welcome you to Crackerbox Palace
We’ve been expecting you
You bring such joy in Crackerbox Palace
No matter where you roam know our love is true

While growing up or trying to
Not knowing where to start
I looked around for someone who
May help reveal my heart – someone said

While you’re a part of Cracerbox Palace
Do what the rest all do
Or face the fact that Crackerbox Palace
May have no other choice than to deport you

I welcome you to Crackerbox Palace
We’ve been expecting you
You bring us joy in Crackerbox Palace
No matter where you roam know our love is true

Sometimes are good . . . sometimes are bad
That’s all a part of life
And standing in between them all
I met a Mr. Grief – and he said

I welcome you to Crackerbox Palace
Was not expecting you
Let’s rap and tap at Crackerbox Palace
Know that the Lord is well and inside of you

(Chorus)

Chi Coltrane – Thunder and Lightning

Chi Coltrane can sing rock, blues and anything in between. I remember this song but I’m stunned that she didn’t have more hits. She was signed by Clive Davis and had this hit single and a couple of critically acclaimed albums. This song was her only hit back in 1972. It peaked at #17 in the Billboard 100, #4 in Germany and #18 in Canada. She moved to Europe in 1977 and started a career there. She gained a large following with many hits and still performs to this day.

She is an excellent musician, producer, singer, and songwriter. She wrote Thunder and Lightning. Unlike some other singer-songwriters of the time…Chi was said to have been equal to a session musician in her piano playing.

Thunder and Lightning

Oooh, what a good thing I’ve got
Oh, it’s such a good thing I’ve got
I don’t think I can stand it

Thunder and lightning, oh yeah!
I tell you it’s frightening, oooh!
It’s thunder and lightning
And you’re in control

I thought my life was complete
But look what you’re doin’ to me
Oh, you’re makin’ me crazy

Thunder and lightning, oh yeah!
I tell you it’s frightening, ooohooo!
It’s thunder and lightning
And you’re in control

I don’t know how to handle it
It’s more than I would dare
I wouldn’t try to run from it
It reaches everywhere

I’m feelin’ dizzy and weak
You make me forget how to speak
I can feel it happening

It’s thunder and lightning, oh yeah!
I tell you it’s frightening, ooohooo!
Thunder and lightning
And you’re in control

Oh, thunder and lightning, ooohooo!
I tell you it’s frightening, oh yeah!
I tell it’s thunder and lightning, ooohooo!
I tell you it’s frightening, oh yeah!

I tell you thunder and lightning, oh yeah!
Don’t you know that it’s frightening, oh yeah!
I know it’s thunder and lightning

Lava Lamps

I own a couple of lava lamps and I run them quite a bit. I didn’t get my first one until the 80s and I still have it. They do nothing but do their thing…and they create a mood. I have one in my office at work…it helps at times.

The lava lamp was invented in 1963 by Edward Craven WalkerHe was passing the time in a pub when he noticed a homemade egg timer crafted from a cocktail shaker filled with alien-looking liquids bubbling on a stove top. Craven Walker’s company was manufacturing millions of “Astro Lamps,” as he called them, per year. In 1965, he sold the U.S. manufacturing rights to a company called Lava Lite.

Lava lamps caught on in the sixties and continued to be big to the late seventies. The sales cooled off until the Austin Power movies and the sales started to pick up again in the hundreds of thousands a year. Now Lava Lite supplies millions of lava lamps to retailers.

Far Out Man

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