Max Headroom Hijack Airwaves in Chicago

Someone in 1987 hijacked the airwaves in Chicago and to this day no one has been identified.

On Sunday, Nov. 22, 1987, Chicago sportscaster Dan Roan was covering the sports highlights of the day like normal. This night would be different. At 9:14, Dan Roan disappeared from the screen. In fact, everything disappeared from the screen as it flickered into darkness. Then, 15 seconds later, a new figure appeared.

Someone with a rubber Max Headroom mask with just static…started bobbing his or her head on the screen. It only lasted around 20 seconds and Dan laughed and blamed it on the computer. The employees of the station thought it was an inside job but it wasn’t…they searched everywhere in the building but it did not come from inside the station. It was creepy but harmless…but whoever did it wasn’t finished yet.

Later on, viewers watching “Doctor Who” on WTTW-TV in Chicago got a big surprise.  A 90-second hijacking of the airwaves, featuring the same person dressed as Max Headroom. This time it was a little more action. Headroom bobbed his head again and said a few things. The audio was hard to make out on one viewing. He held up a can of Pepsi while reciting the Coca-Cola slogan “catch the wave.” Max Headroom was, at the time, being used as a spokesperson for Coke. Near the end, he turned around and was spanked by a woman…There was more to it and both videos are below in the post.

Most of Chicago found this hilarious but…The FCC did NOT see the humor at all. They used all of their resources to see who hijacked the airwaves. They offered a reward for anyone knowing the people responsible. They released this message:

“I would like to inform anybody involved in this kinda thing, that there’s a maximum penalty of $100,000, one year in jail, or both,” Phil Bradford, an FCC spokesman, told a reporter the following day.

“All in all, there are some who may view this as comical,” WTTW spokesman Anders Yocom said. “But it is a very serious matter because illegal interference of a broadcast signal is a violation of federal law. ”

The hijacker was never found and to this day people still wonder who it was and why they did it. The FCC worked out how it could have been accomplished without expensive equipment…by placing his or her own dish antenna between the transmitter tower, the hacker could have effectively interrupted the original signal by good timing and positioning.

1st incident.

 

2nd incident

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Headroom_broadcast_signal_intrusion

 

 

 

John Lennon – God ——— Songs that reference The Beatles

I don’t believe in Elvis, I don’t believe in Zimmerman, I don’t believe in Beatles

Before recording this album, John and Yoko began “Primal Scream therapy,” which was a very emotional time for them. Lennon was dealing with the breakup of The Beatles and focusing on the death of his mother a decade earlier. His interviews at the time had a “scorched earth” feel about them. He basically was breaking ties with his past completely and starting anew.

John could be a walking contradiction.

In a 1969 interview John gave that was broadcast on the BBC recently he was asked about the “The Beatles bigger than Christ” he gave in 1966.

“It’s just an expression meaning the Beatles seem to me to have more influence over youth than Christ.  Now I wasn’t saying that was a good idea, ‘cos I’m one of Christ’s biggest fans. And if I can turn the focus on the Beatles on to Christ’s message, then that’s what we’re here to do.” 1969.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/52400/Lennon-Bigger-than-Christ-I-m-one-of-his-fans

This song is as strong as any of his Beatles songs. The word I would use would be Powerful to describe it. God was released on his debut album  John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band album in 1970. The song is so personal that sometimes I feel uncomfortable listening to it.

When Lennon was recording this at Abbey Road studios, George Harrison was next door completing work on All Things Must Pass. George Harrison said “I was in one room singing ‘My Sweet Lord’, “and John was in another room singing ‘I don’t believe in Jesus, I don’t believe in nothing’.”

John Lennon: “I was going to leave a gap, and just fill in your own words: whoever you don’t believe in. It had just got out of hand, and Beatles was the final thing because I no longer believe in the myth, and Beatles is another myth. I don’t believe in it. The dream is over. I’m not just talking about the Beatles, I’m talking about the generation thing. It’s over, and we gotta – I have to personally – get down to so-called reality.”

From Songfacts

Lennon wrote this about the worship of false idols. He felt organized religion did more harm than good. In “Imagine,” he sang about a better world where there was “no religion.”

Lennon was not an atheist but believed that God was something different to everyone. He also believed that people focus too much on the teacher (God) rather than what is supposed to be taught. In songs like this one and “Imagine,” Lennon was trying to send the message that we should not let religion and other things get in the way of how we think life should be lived. In “Imagine,” “Living for today,” means to live as if there is no afterlife or god and to do the best you can. In this song, “I just believe in me,” states his belief in his life regardless of anything else. 

At the time, Lennon had some hard feelings toward The Beatles, especially Paul McCartney. He made a statement that he was moving on with the line, “I don’t believe in Beatles.”

Billy Preston played the piano on this track. He also played on some of The Beatles’ songs, including “Get Back.” Preston, who came from a gospel background, was troubled by the song’s atheistic vibe but kept his feelings to himself. He had similar issues when performing “Sympathy For The Devil” on tour with the Rolling Stones.

Ringo Starr played drums. He and Lennon had a good relationship even after The Beatles broke up.

This contains the classic line, “The Dream Is Over.” This summed up the feelings of many who felt their idealistic goals of the ’60s were not going to come true.

In the January 1971 edition of Rolling Stone, Lennon said that this, “was put together from three songs almost.” He went on to the explain that the words for this “just came out of me mouth.” The former Beatle continued: “I had the idea that ‘God is the concept by which we measure pain,’ so that when you have a word like that, you just sit down and sing the first tune that comes into your head and the tune is simple, because I like that kind of music and then I just rolled into it. It was just going on in my head and I got by the first three or four, the rest just came out. Whatever came out.”

Among the list of idols in this song, which Lennon said he didn’t believe in was The Beatles. Lennon explained why to Rolling Stone: 

Lennon starts this song with the line, “God is a concept by which we measure our pain.” He explained to Rolling Stone that, “pain is the pain we go through all the time,” Then added: “You’re born in pain. Pain is what we are in most of the time, and I think that the bigger the pain, the more God you look for.”

God

God is a concept
By which we measure
Our pain
I’ll say it again
God is a concept
By which we measure
Our pain

I don’t believe in magic
I don’t believe in I-Ching
I don’t believe in Bible
I don’t believe in tarot
I don’t believe in Hitler
I don’t believe in Jesus
I don’t believe in Kennedy
I don’t believe in Buddha
I don’t believe in mantra
I don’t believe in Gita
I don’t believe in yoga
I don’t believe in kings
I don’t believe in Elvis
I don’t believe in Zimmerman
I don’t believe in Beatles
I just believe in me
Yoko and me
And that’s reality

The dream is over
What can I say?
The dream is over
Yesterday
I was the dream weaver
But now I’m reborn
I was the Walrus
But now I’m John
And so dear friends
You just have to carry on
The dream is over

John Mellencamp – Key West Intermezzo (I Saw You First) ———Songs that reference The Beatles

In a hand painted night, me and Gypsy Scotty are partners, At the Hotel Flamingo, wearin black market shoes, This loud Cuban band is crucifying John Lennon

This song was released in 1996 and it came off the album Mr. Happy Go Lucky. The song peaked at #14 in the Billboard 100, #1 in Canada and #83 in the UK in 1996. It’s a very good pop song and Key West Intermezzo (I Saw You First), which was Mellencamp’s last US top 40 hit.

John Mellencamp and Cougar had 29 songs in the Billboard 100, 10 top ten hits and one number 1 (Jack and Diane). He released this two years after his minor heart attack in 1994. I’ve always liked this song…catchy riff and a good pop hook.

 

Key West Intermezzo (I Saw You First)

In a hand painted night, me and Gypsy Scotty are partners
At the Hotel Flamingo, wearin black market shoes
This loud Cuban band is crucifying John Lennon
No one wants to be lonely, no one wants to sing the blues

She’s perched like a parrot on his tuxedo shoulder
Christ, what’s she doing with him she could be dancing with me
She stirs the ice in her glass with her elegant finger
I want to be what she’s drinking, yeah I just want to be

I saw you first
I’m the first one tonight
I saw you first
Don’t that give me the right
To move around in your heart
Everyone was lookin
But I saw you first

On a moon spattered road in her parrot rebozo
Gypsy Scotty is driving his big long yellow car
She flies like a bird over his shoulder
Se whispers in his ear, boy, you are my star

But I saw you first
I’m the first one tonight
Yes I saw you first
Don’t that give me the right
To move around in your heart
Everyone was lookin’

In the bone colored dawn, me and Gypsy Scotty are singin’
The radio is playin, she left her shoes out in the back
He tells me a story about some girl he knows in Kentucky
He just made that story up, there ain’t no girl like that

But I saw you first
I’m the first one tonight
Yes I saw you first
Don’t that give me the right
To move around in your heart
Everyone was lookin
But I saw you first
I saw you first

Ramones – Do You Remember Rock ‘n’ Roll Radio? ——— Songs that reference The Beatles

Will you remember Jerry Lee, John Lennon, T. Rex and old Moulty?
It’s the end, the end of the seventies, It’s the end, the end of the century

Phil Spector produced the End of the Century album. This track was fitting, as Spector worked on a lot of the music that influenced The Ramones. Spector changed their sound to a more radio-friendly pop/rock record.

The voice that opens this song with the words, “Come on, let’s rock and roll with the Ramones” is Sean Donahue, a disc jockey who worked at radio stations in San Francisco (KSAN) and San Jose (KOME, KSJP).

The album peaked at #44 in the Billboard 100 in 1980. Different band members had problems with Spector. The Ramones worked fast live and in the studio but Spector was methodical about his work.

Dee Dee Ramone on Phil Spector:

He levelled his gun at my heart and then motioned for me and the rest of the band to get back in the piano room … He only holstered his pistol when he felt secure that his bodyguards could take over. Then he sat down at his black concert piano and made us listen to him play and sing “Baby, I Love You” until well after 4:30 in the morning.

Marky Ramone denied this…

From Songfacts

This song is a tribute to the music of the ’50s and ’60 that influenced The Ramones. Here’s a breakdown of the lyrical references:

“Hullabaloo” – A UK TV show featuring music and dancing that aired 1965-1966.

“Upbeat” – The Upbeat Show, which was a Cleveland TV show (also with music and dancing) that aired 1964-1971.

“Shindig” – The first prime time Rock music show, many top acts performed on the program. It aired 1964-1966.

“Ed Sullivan” – Host of The Ed Sullivan Show, a popular variety show that lasted more than 20 years. Many famous musicians appeared on the show, including The Beatles, The Doors and The Rolling Stones.

“Murray The K” – Murray “The K” Kaufman, a legendary disc jockey who helped promote rock n’ roll in the States on his radio show and through concerts he helped organize. He championed The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan.

“Alan Freed” – Another very influential disc jockey, Freed is credited with coining the term “Rock And Roll.”

“Jerry Lee” – Jerry Lee Lewis was a rock originator known for his electrifying performances.

“John Lennon” – Most punk bands wouldn’t claim Lennon and The Beatles as an influence, but The Ramones were a nuanced group that shared an appreciation of his work.

“T. Rex” – Glam Rock originators known for their outrageous costumes and stage presence.

“Ol’ Moulty” – Victor Moulton, who was the drummer in a group called The Barbarians.

 Under Spector’s control, he took The Ramones in a new direction, giving the songs on the album a pop sheen and radio-friendly sound. There is a prominent saxophone on the track, which was played by Steve Douglas, who was a member of Spector’s “Wrecking Crew” and played on many of his famous productions.

Spector developed a reputation as being a bit of a maniac, which in part can be attributed to statements Dee Dee Ramone made about working with him. Dee Dee claimed the Spector pulled a gun on him at one point, and was a tyrant in the studio. Spector did some work with Yoko Ono the following year, but became very reclusive until the ’00s, when he produced an album for the English band Starsailor that was released in 2003. In February 2003, Spector was accused of shooting and killing a nightclub hostess at his home.

The closing lyrics, “It’s the end of the ’70s, it’s the end of the century” imply that the musical century was essentially over. The line provided the album title.

In our interview with drummer Marky Ramone, he said that one the band put down their tracks, Phil Spector threw the works (horns, strings, percussion) at the songs on End of the Century, especially this one. “It’s mountainous the way that song is,” he said. “He had a lot of great studio musicians playing on that album just to create a wall of sound, which he was known for. That song took a while. There’s a lot of parts in it.”

Marky adds that the story about Spector pulling a gun in the studio is overblown. He says that while Spector did carry a gun and would sometimes take it off to work, he never threatened anyone with it.

The Ramones made a music video for this song that was directed by Mark Robinson, who also did their clip for “Rock ‘N’ Roll High School.” It was one of the few videos available to MTV when the network launched in 1981, but they gave it very little airplay. MTV tried to program a rock format at the time, and were desperate for videos by American bands in that genre. The Ramones fit the bill, but their videos didn’t have the production value to match what was coming out of Europe.

The intro is meant to elicit the sound of a DJ enthusiastically talking up the song at a radio station.

Do You Remember Rock and Roll Radio?

(This is Rock ‘n’ roll radio, come on, let’s rock ‘n’ roll with the Ramones)

Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go
Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go
Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go
Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go

Do you remember Hullabaloo
Upbeat, Shindig and Ed Sullivan, too?
Do you remember rock ‘n’ roll radio?
Do you remember rock ‘n’ roll radio?

Do you remember Murray the K
Alan Freed, and High Energy?
It’s the end, the end of the seventies
It’s the end, the end of the century

Do you remember lying in bed
With the covers pulled up over your head
Radio playin’ so no one can see?
We need change, and we need it fast
Before rock’s just part of the past
‘Cause lately, it all sounds the same to me
Whoah-whoah, oh

Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go
Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go
Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go
Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go

Will you remember Jerry Lee
John Lennon, T. Rex and old Moulty?
It’s the end, the end of the seventies
It’s the end, the end of the century

Do you remember lying in bed
With the covers pulled up over your head
Radio playin’ so no one can see?
We need change, and we need it fast
Before Rock’s just part of the past
‘Cause lately, it all sounds the same to me
Whoah-whoah, oh

Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go
Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go
Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go
Rock’n, rock ‘n’ roll radio, let’s go

(This is rock ‘N’ roll radio, stay tuned for more rock ‘n’ roll)

Paul Simon – The Late Great Johnny Ace ——— Songs that reference The Beatles

I was living in London, With the girl from the summer before, It was the year of the Beatles, It was the year of the Stones 

On a cold December evening, I was walking through the Christmas tide, When a stranger came up and asked me If I’d heard John Lennon had died 

This song referenced both Johnny Ace the R&B Artist who supposedly have shot himself in a game of Russian roulette in 1954, JFK and John Lennon who was killed on December 8, 1980.

I remember the song on the Simon & Garfunkel reunion concert in Central Park video. When Paul started the part about Lennon a man rushed the stage, shocking Paul especially since it was under a year since Lennon’s murder.

“The Late Great Johnny Ace” is a song by Paul Simon, which is on the 1983 Hearts and Bones album.

The Late Great Johnny Ace

I was reading a magazine 
And thinking of a rock and roll song 
The year was 1954 
And I hadn’t been playing that long 
When a man came on the radio 
And this is what he said 
He said I hate to break it 
To his fans 
But Johnny Ace is dead 
Well, I really wasn’t 
Such a Johnny Ace fan 
But I felt bad all the same 
So I sent away for his photograph 
And I waited till it came 
It came all the way from Texas 
With a sad and simple face 
And they signed it on the bottom 
From the Late Great Johnny Ace 
It was the year of the Beatles 
It was the year of the Stones 
It was 1964 
I was living in London 
With the girl from the summer before 
It was the year of the Beatles 
It was the year of the Stones 
A year after J.F.K. 
We were staying up all night 
And giving the days away 
And the music was flowing 
Amazing 
And blowing my way 
On a cold December evening 
I was walking through the Christmas tide 
When a stranger came up and asked me 
If I’d heard John Lennon had died 
And the two of us 
Went to this bar 
And we stayed to close the place 
And every song we played 
Was for the Late Great Johnny Ace

Johnny Rivers – Summer Rain ——— Songs that reference The Beatles

All summer long we were dancing in the sand, Everybody just kept on playing “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”

Ok, I’m cheating a little on this kinda… It doesn’t mention “Beatles” but Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band was the Beatles alter ego on the Sgt Peppers album.

This song was a hit for Johnny Rivers and it was written by James Hendricks. Summer Rain was on his Realization album released in 1968. It was written about the Summer of Love in 1967. The song peaked at #14 in the Billboard 100, #10 in Canada in 1968.

I like Johnny Rivers…he was strictly a singles artist and had some good songs. He did chart a lot of covers in his career. He had 29 songs in the top 100, 9 top ten songs and 1 number 1 (Poor Side of Town).

I first heard this song in the 80s on a local oldies station at the time… 96.3 in Nashville.

 

Summer Rain

Summer rain taps at my window
West wind soft as a sweet dream
My love, warm as the sunshine
Sitting here by me, yeah
She’s here by meShe stepped out of a rainbow
Golden hair shining like moonglow
Warm lips, soft as her soul
Sitting here by me, now
She’s here by meAll summer long we were dancing in the sand
Everybody just kept on playing “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”We sailed into the sunset
Drifting home, caught by a gulf stream
Never gave a thought for tomorrow
Let tomorrow be, yeah
Let tomorrow be
She wants to live in the Rockies
She says that’s where we’ll find peace
Settle down, raise up a family
One to call our own, yeah
We will have a home
All summer long we were grooving in the sand
Everybody just kept on playing “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”
Winter snows drift by my window
North wind blowing like thunder
Our love is burning like fire
She’s here by me, yeah
She’s here by me
Let tomorrow be
Songwriters: James Hendric

Beady Eye – Beatles and Stones ——— Songs that reference The Beatles

Well, this reference is pretty obvious…

I’m gonna stand the test of time Like Beatles and Stones

Beady Eye was a band formed by  Liam Gallagher of Oasis with former members of Oasis. This song was written by Liam Gallagher and it was on the Different Gear, Still Speeding album released in 2011.

They recycled the Who’s My Generation riff to good effect. They defiantly have that mid-sixties mod thing going on.

Beady Eye released two albums. Different Gear, Still Speeding (#3 UK) in 2011 and BE (#2 UK) in 2013. In 2014 Beady Eye broke up because of the failure to gain popularity in the US according to Liam Gallagher.

Beatles and Stones

Well it beats me mama, I just want to rock and roll
Well it beats me mama, I just want to rock and roll
I’m gonna stand the test of time
Like Beatles and Stones

Well it freaks them mama
I’m not doin’ what I’m told
Well it freaks them mama
You know I can’t be bought and sold
I’m gonna stand the test of time
Like Beatles and Stones

I’m on my way home, just get back to what’s mine
And when I get home, well I’ll be alright

Well it beats me mama, I just want to rock and roll
I’m gonna stand the test of time
Like Beatles and Stones

I’m on my way home, just get back to what’s mine
And when I get home, well I’ll be alright

What’s that you say?
Get out the way!

Well it beats me mama, I just want to rock and roll
Well it beats me mama, I just want to rock and roll
I’m gonna stand the test of time
Like Beatles and Stones

Well it freaks them mama

I’m not doin’ what I’m told
Well it freaks them mama
You know I can’t be bought and sold
I’m gonna stand the test of time
Like Beatles and Stones

I’m on my way home, just get back to what’s mine
And when I get home, well I’ll be alright
Well it beats me mama, I just want to rock and roll
I’m gonna stand the test of time
Like Beatles and Stones

I’m on my way home, just get back to what’s mine
And when I get home, well I’ll be alright

What’s that you say?
Get out the way!