Badfinger – Lay Me Down

Lay Me Down was written by Pete Ham and is a wonderful pop/rock song. Another song that slipped through the cracks…I’ve heard Teenage Fanclub cover this one and I’ve liked it as well as their known hits.  I want to thank everyone who stuck with me through four Badfinger songs since Thursday.

The song was on the album Head First. Joey Molland had just quit and was replaced by Bob Jackson.

Badfinger’s management replaced Chris Thomas as producer because he didn’t think they should make an album so soon (6 months) after their last album Wish You Were Here. The band felt the same but they had no control… Kenny Kerner and Richie Wise was picked to produce them, Wise had just become successful by producing KISS.

They recorded Head First in December 1974 – January 1975 after Wish You Were Here with new member Bob Jackson. While recording the album Warner Brothers wanted to know where thousands of dollars went to that disappeared from an escrow account (in the managers pocket).

WB’s sought to attach the royalties due from their previous album Wish You Were Here. Consequently, WB suspended sales of Wish You Were Here.

Although the master tapes of Head First were delivered to and accepted by WB’s recording division in Los Angeles, WB’s publishing arm there refused to accept them because of the lawsuit. With a lack of publishing protection, the record division shelved the tapes and the album was not released.

The album was stuck in limbo for 26 years. It wasn’t released until 2000. I went out and bought this the day it was released at Tower Records. On a couple of songs, Hey Mr Manager and Rock and Roll Contract,  they are taking aim at their management and frustration. The songs that stand out to me are Lay Me Down, Hey Mr. Manager, Rock N’ Roll Contract, and Keep Believing. A good album and I wish it would have had a chance at the time it was recorded.

This song would have had a chance to chart.

This would be the last album released by Badfinger with Pete Ham. He would die 3 months after they finished the album. Tom Evans and Joey Molland would revive Badfinger in the late seventies and release two albums. They did have two minor hits.

Lay Me Down

Need your loving
Need your loving
Need your loving
It’s everything to me

Need your loving
Need your loving
Need your loving
It’s everything to me

Take me high take me low
Show me anything that you know
But tonight little lover lay me down
Make me laugh make me sigh tell me how and tell me why
But tonight lover little lay me down

Lay me down move me round
Let me hear your loving sound
In our mess we are blessed with our love
Take and give take and live all the love that we have found
And just send all our problems away

Play me fun play me sad
Tell me things that could make you glad
But tonight lover little Lay me down
Lay me down
Need you loving

Play to share play to care
You can play with me anywhere
But tonight lover little lay me down
But tonight lover little lover lay me down
Lay me down
Need your loving

Jayhawks – Big Star

I love this band…it seems I have a fondness for bands that released good to great music but never could get over that hump to mass audiences. Maybe if they would have cleared that obstacle their music would have changed…but who knows… maybe it’s a part of their appeal.

This song comes out in 1997 and was on their Sound of Lies album. At first I thought it was about the Memphis band Big Star and it is kinda…and also about The Jayhawks and loving what you have now. The album peaked at #112 in the Billboard Album Chart and #61 in the UK.

They have a Kinks tie… They recently backed Ray Davies on his albums Americana and Our Country – Americana Act II. Their 2016 album Paging Mr. Proust was produced by Peter Buck of REM.

They formed in the mid-80s in the Twin Cities .

Gary Louris when asked if the song is about the band Big Star: “Not exactly. Maybe in the back of my mind.” “You could say it about the Velvet Underground or Big Star or The Jayhawks,” “world’s unluckiest bands. They should have been bigger. But everybody in the audience started a band. Everybody that saw them started a band. The old cliché. But it’s true.”

 “I have a lot of famous friends.” “about achieving a place that you thought you wanted to be and maybe it would make you happy. It’s a typical human response. If I get there, then I’m finally going to be happy. And in reality, you probably won’t be. You should just be happy with what you have.”

Big Star

I’m flat-busted
Wild-eyed and free
I couldn’t get arrested if I tried
A has-been at a mere thirty-five

Straight, honest, forthright and true
Great expectations for someone
Doesn’t anybody know how to have fun
But I’m

Gonna be a Big Star
I’m gonna be a Big Star someday
I’m gonna be a Big Star someday

Grape’s bitter
I’m no quitter
Revolutions come one by one
Seems it’s high noon and I ain’t got no gun

But it’s so hard
So hard
So hard getting by

Gonna be a Big Star
I’m gonna be a Big Star someday
I’m gonna be a Big Star someday

Fine bourbon, Cuban cigars
Rude remarks observed at the C.C. Bar
I’m perfecting the finest art of wasting hours
But I’m

Gonna be a Big Star
I’m gonna be a Big Star someday
I’m gonna be a Big Star someday

I’m gonna be a Big Star
I’m gonna be a Big Star someday

Droogs – Ahead Of My Time

The lyrics won’t make you mistake these guys for Bob Dylan but the guitar action is pretty cool in this one.

Several years before it became fashionable…the Droogs were playing what would later be called “garage revival”. They started playing together as pre-teens in 1966 and began issuing singles in the early to mid seventies.

Ahead of My Time was released in 1974. They missed out on the garage band sixties and they were ahead of the curve of the 60s garage band revival in the late 70’s.

They started to release albums in the mid-eighties and were part of the Paisley Underground Scene. They released 8 albums between 1984 to 2017.

The Droogs just released an album in 2017  called Young Gun and are still together doing their thing.

Ahead Of My Time

Hey babe, this must be your lucky day babe
I wanna kiss you if I may babe
Don’t care what people have to say babe

I’ve got to love you, the only way that I can
So please don’t misunderstand
They’ll tell you that I’m not your kind
But I’m just ahead of my time.

In your neighborhood, got a reputation that’s none too good.
For knowing things no young man should
I know baby, you would if you could

I’ve got to love you, the only way that I can
So please don’t me be your man
They’ll tell you true love’s hard to find
But I’m just ahead of my time.
I’m just ahead of my time.
I’m just ahead of my time.

We’re just ahead of our time.
We’re just ahead of our time.
We’re just ahead of our time.

Hey babe, this must be your lucky day babe
I wanna kiss you if I may babe
Don’t care what people have to say babe

I’ve got to love you, all the way babe

Fountains of Wayne – Stacy’s Mom …. Power Pop Friday

It’s hard not to like this song. it’s fun and the video should not to be missed. When I was growing up…I don’t remember any friend’s moms looking like Rachel Hunter though.

The song was credited to  Chris Collingwood and Adam Schlesinger…but Schlesinger wrote it. Stacy’s Mom was released in 2003 on the Welcome Interstate Managers album.

The intro resembles the Cars Just What I Needed and they even asked Ric Ocasek to be in the video for the song. He never responded but they had some tributes to him in the video.  A license plate reads “I ♥ RIC” and a young kid dressed similar to Ocasek with dark hair and sunglasses. They also re-created the scene from the movie Fast Times at Ridgemont High, which featured the Cars’ “Moving in Stereo.”

Adam Schlesinger said that he had Simon & Garfunkel’s “Mrs. Robinson” in the back of his mind when he wrote Stacy’s Mom… “It was a contrast of that story against a track that sounded like ’80s new wave, like The Cars or something.”

Adam also said that one of his friends when he was 11 or 12 was attracted…not to his mom but to his grandmother. He told Schlesinger that she was “really hot.” That incident helped him write the song.

It peaked at #21 in the Billboard 100, #11 in the UK, and #13 in Canada in 2003

The band Bowling For Soup has been misidentified as the band that did Stacy’s Mom. Youtube and even some of their fans even thought they were the band that did the song…so…they covered it! They do sound somewhat like Fountains Of Wayne.

Jaret Reddick (Bowling for Soup leader) said that by finally releasing their own version of the song, “I’ve basically just taken care of a large part of the population that’s been wrong for years, and I’ve made them right.” The cover art for their version of the  song release reads: “Finally you can say this is your favorite song by BFS and not look like an idiot!”

Unfortunately Adam Schlesinger passed away on April 1, 2020 from complications of Covid-19…he was only 52 years old.

Songfacts

The Cars’ influence is obvious – just compare the intro of their track, “Just What I Needed,” to the intro of “Stacy’s Mom” to hear for yourself.

This song was a commercial success and reached #1 on iTunes’ Most Downloaded Songs chart. In 2004, it was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Vocal Pop Performance. Adam Schlesinger told us “Stacy’s Mom” “is definitely the biggest of my own band stuff.” Schlesinger added to Bullz-Eye.com that he does not think Fountains of Wayne will achieve the same level of success they did with “Stacy’s Mom” ever again: “I think ‘Stacy’s Mom’ was a fluke thing where it was the right song and the right video, and you kind of had the novelty factor, and all that stuff. And you can’t really make that happen again.”

Actress and model, Rachel Hunter, portrayed Stacy’s mom in the song’s official video – directed by Chris Applebaum. Parts of the video bear a striking resemblance to the movie Fast Times at Ridgemont High. At one point in the movie, a character named Brad is in a bathroom fantasizing about his sister’s friend and the friend walks in on him. His sister’s name, coincidentally, is Stacy. .

The song featured in a commercial for the Cadillac SRX, which shows a woman picking up her daughter from school. As she does so, men gaze longingly at her “beautifully practical and practically beautiful” …car.

Stacy’s Mom

Stacy’s mom has got it goin’ on
Stacy’s mom has got it goin’ on
Stacy’s mom has got it goin’ on
Stacy’s mom has got it goin’ on

Stacy, can I come over after school? (after school)
We can hang around by the pool (hang by the pool)
Did your mom get back from her business trip? (business trip)
Is she there, or is she trying to give me the slip? (give me the slip)

You know, I’m not the little boy that I used to be
I’m all grown up now, baby can’t you see

Stacy’s mom has got it goin’ on
She’s all I want and I’ve waited for so long
Stacy, can’t you see you’re just not the girl for me
I know it might be wrong but I’m in love with Stacy’s mom

Stacy’s mom has got it goin’ on
Stacy’s mom has got it goin’ on

Stacy, do you remember when I mowed your lawn? (mowed your lawn)
Your mom came out with just a towel on (towel on)
I could tell she liked me from the way she stared (way she stared)
And the way she said, “you missed a spot over there” (a spot over there)

And I know that you think it’s just a fantasy
But since your dad walked out, your mom could use a guy like me

Stacy’s mom has got it goin’ on
She’s all I want, and I’ve waited so long
Stacy, can’t you see you’re just not the girl for me
I know it might be wrong
But I’m in love with Stacy’s mom

Stacy’s mom has got it goin’ on
She’s all I want and I’ve waited for so long
Stacy can’t you see you’re just not the girl for me
I know it might be wrong
I’m in love with (Stacy’s mom oh oh)
I’m in love with (Stacy’s mom oh oh)
Stacy can’t you see you’re just not the girl for me
I know it might be wrong, but
I’m in love with (Stacy’s mom oh oh)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stacy%27s_Mom

Otis Gibbs

I came across Otis’s youtube channel and I think some of you would be interested. He is a singer songwriter but on his channel he has conversations musicians who have played or worked with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Tom Petty, Waylon Jennings, just to name a few, and  his own stories about different musicians. For you music fans it’s worth your time. The guy doesn’t interview people…he lets people talk and tell their stories.  He is also a good story teller. I’m hooked on his channel.

He has stories about Jerry Reed, The Replacements, Dan Baird, Merle Haggard, Ry Cooder, Towns Van Zant, Bill Monroe, George Jones, Johnny Paycheck, John Prine, Mike Campbell and more.

He lives in Indiana but interviews many Nashville connected musicians. Check this guy out…His music is VERY good as well. I’m just checking that out more as I go… his music is classified as alt-country.

I just picked a few random youtube videos from his page below.

This is his youtube page:

https://www.youtube.com/user/otisgibbs

Chuck Mead – 90s Alternative Country band BR5-49…talking about when he toured with Bob Dylan

Kenny Vaughn – Lucinda Williams  guitar player at the time talks about touring with Tom Petty

Chuck Mead again with Keith Richards

Dan Baird on the Replacements

Otis Gibbs Wiki

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otis_Gibbs

Paul Simon – Old

I heard this in 2000 and it sounded like the Paul Simon of old…no pun intended.  It’s about when people telling you…you are getting old whether you are there or not.

It was on the album You’re The One released in 2000. You’re The One was nominated for a Grammy Award for Album of the Year in 2001. As a result Simon became the first artist to be nominated in that category in five consecutive decades (1960s-2000s). Paul McCartney also joined that club in 2006 with his album Chaos and Creation in the Backyard.

You’re the One‘s generally upbeat tone arose out of his happy home life with singer Edie Brickell and their children… “the first time that I ever had domestic bliss.”

You’re The One peaked at #19 in the Billboard Album Chart, #8 in Canada, and #20 in the UK. This release was 3 years after his album Songs from the Capeman which contained songs from a Broadway Play he wrote.

Old

The first time I heard ‘Peggy Sue’, I was twelve years old
Russians up in a rocket ships and the war was cold
Now many wars have come and gone, genocide still goes on
Buddy Holly still goes on, but his catalog was sold

First time I smoked, guess what, paranoid
First time I heard ‘Satisfaction’, I was young and unemployed
Down the decades every year, summer leaves and my birthday’s here
And all my friends stand up and cheer

Say man you’re old
Getting old
You’re old
You’re getting old

We celebrate the birth of Jesus on Christmas Day
And Buddha found Nirvana along the Lotus Way
About fifteen hundred years ago the messenger Mohammed spoke
And his wisdom like a river flowed through hills of gold

Wisdom is old
The Koran is old
The Bible is old
Greatest story ever told

Disagreements?
Work ’em out

The human races walked the Earth for two point seven million
And we estimate the universe about thirteen to fourteen billion
When all these numbers tumble into your imagination
Consider that the Lord was there before creation

God is old
We’re not old
God is old
He made the mold

Take your clothes off
Adam and Eve

Caesars – Jerk It Out

It sounds like it could have been recorded in 1966 by a garage band in Ohio. This song is a bit unknown but like most songs today you may have heard it on commercials. This song just hits you right away with it’s distorted organ.

What a cool mid-sixties garage sound The Caesars had on this song…I like good riffs…and this one has a great organ hook. I first heard it in the mid-2000s and I’ve loved it ever since. It peaked at #70 in the Billboard 100 in 2005 and #8 in the UK in 2003. I first noticed it on an Ipod commercial and have recommended it to friends.

This was the first hit for The Caesars, who are known as The Caesar’s Palace in their native country of Sweden, and Twelve Caesars throughout the rest of Scandinavia…However due to copyrights from Caesars Palace Casino, they are known as The Caesars throughout the rest of the world.

The band went on hiatus in 2012 but since has reunited. I posted this song when I first started but only had one maybe two readers…I heard it again yesterday and had to repost it.

From Songfacts.

No hidden meaning in this song – it’s just about dancing and getting loose. It received a lot of attention in the United States after it was featured in an iPod ad. The popular iPod ads also helped boost the popularity for songs like “Are You Gonna Be My Girl” by Aussie rock band JET, and “Flathead” by the Scottish band The Fratellis.

According to the band, the title “Jerk It Out” means “to just let out some steam, freak out, let yourself go, get crazy, etc.” The title has a double meaning, as it can easily be taken as being about masturbation. Keeping with the sexual double meanings, the remix of this song was called “Jerk It Harder.”

Jerk It Out

Wind me up
Put me down
Start me off and watch me go
I’ll be runnin’ circles around you sooner than you know
A little off center
And I’m out of tune
Just kickin’ this can along the avenue
But I’m alright

‘Cause it’s easy once you know how it’s done
You can’t stop now
It’s already begun
You feel it runnin’ through your bones
And you jerk it out
And you jerk it out

Shut up
Hush your mouth
Can’t you hear you talk too loud
No can’t hear nothin’ ’cause I got my head up in the clouds
I bite off anything that I can chew
I’m chasing cars up and down the avenue
But that’s okay

‘Cause it’s easy once you know how it’s done
You can’t stop now
It’s already begun
You feel it runnin’ through your bones
And you jerk it out

‘Cause it’s easy once you know how it’s done
You can’t stop now
It’s already begun
You feel it runnin’ through your bones
And you jerk it out
And you jerk it out

And you jerk it out
And you jerk it out
Oh baby don’t you know 
You really gotta jerk it out
When you jerk it out
Oh baby don’t you know 
You really gotta jerk it out
When you jerk it out
Oh baby don’t you know you
You really gotta jerk it out

Replacements – Message to the Boys

Thanks to Aphoristical for pointing me to this song and album. At the end of 2005, years after the band had broken up…Warner Music Group ended up with rights to the Replacements’ Twin/Tone albums, and their entire catalog was finally placed under one roof. They offered Westerberg and Stinson a deal for the band to reunite and record. They wanted to package a “Best Of” album with a few new songs.

They had been feuding with each other off and on since the break up. Westerberg and Stinson ended their feud and agreed to do it. They did not invite Slim Dunlap to participate for some reason. They did however invite drummer Chris Mars to join them. They patched things up with Mars but he was an artist and doing it for a living and didn’t want to play. He did come to the sessions anyway. Drummer  Josh Freese had flown out to play drums. To show you how they operated…here is Westerberg’s thought on that.

“And Chris, he was still a Replacement…The first thing out of his mouth to Josh was something like, ‘Man, you almost played that really good.’ That’s what we missed. You don’t have to play the drums. You can just bring the attitude.”

The band recorded two songs Message to the Boys and Pool and Dive. They appeared on the album Don’t You Know Who I Think I Was? They didn’t end up touring at that time but offers came in year after year and the money offers got bigger.

Westerberg: “The fact that we came up short is the thing that’s kept us interesting. That is part of the attraction. We’ve retained this mystique.”

Paul and Tommy would later reunite again in 2012. Former guitar player Slim Dunlap had a major stroke and they contributed to a benefit album of Slim’s songs along with many artists. In 2013 they started to play live again and eventually toured until 2015 when it ended abruptly.

Paul Westerberg about the reunion in 2006 and missing former member Bob Stinson: “The answer to the million-dollar question is yes, when Bob died, something died in me and Tommy, and we’ve never been the same since,” said Westerberg. “And it’s always been awkward, and it’s always been unsaid and unsayable and strange and weird between us.”

This concludes taking a song off of each album from the Replacements… thanks for following here every Monday. I’ll still post some Replacements here and there.

Message To The Boys

Well I met her in a bar
Like I always say
She was digging Tommy’s cute
Way down in FLA

Wearing that vest with nothing underneath
Looking her best in the Florida heat
Sent a message to the boys
She was wearing that vest with nothing underneath
She be looking her best in the Florida heat, yeah
Sent a message to the boys

Well, she couldn’t cut loose
With her mommy around
So she packed her pretty bags
Went to the run-away town

Used to call me late at night
Said she missed her little maid
I never asked twice how the bills got paid
She sent a message to the boys
Used to call me every night
Said she missed her little maid
Never ever asked twice how the bills got paid
Sent the message to the boys

She sent a message to the boys
She’s gonna be there, if you need her
I can’t forget her and her voice
And her voice

Was a lady to the end
Now to this I can attest
She knew how to move
Yeah, when she rock’n’rolled this

She sent a message to the boys
She’s gonna be there, if you need her
I can’t forget her and her voice

She sent a message to the boys
She sent a message to the boys
God, I miss her and her voice
She sent a message to the boys
She sent a message to the boys
Oh god, I miss her and her voice

Interview with a Radio Disc Jockey…Keith Allen

We are going to mix it up today. First I want to thank Keith Allen (nostalgicitalian) for being kind enough to answer 15 questions. Keith said he would be happy to answer any questions you have if we didn’t cover it. I have a link to a post of his at the bottom of the page that he elaborates on the last question. 

To make this more well rounded I reached out to a few bloggers for some  questions. Hanspostcard, Vic, LisaRun-Sew-Read, and Dave,…so thank you all. I wanted to reach out more but I didn’t want Keith to have to type a novel worth of answers. 

Remember to go over to Keith’s blog and ask anything that was not covered. First a little about Keith.

Keith Allen’s Bio: 

Keith Allen was born and raised in Michigan.  While he was a senior in high school (1988), he became an intern at WKSG, Kiss-FM in Detroit, which would lead to his first on air job.  He would next work at WMXD-FM also in Detroit.  For someone with no radio experience whatsoever, starting his career in the 6th biggest market in the country (at the time) was pretty special.   

In 1991, he moved to the west side of the state to work at WKZC-FM.  The job was short lived, a mere 6 months.  Upon moving back to Detroit, he was lucky enough to land a job at the first oldies station in the country, the historic Honey Radio (WHND-AM).  It was here that he really honed his on air personality.  When Honey went off the air in 1994, he started at his next country station, WWWW-FM (W4 Country) in Detroit.  Yes, the same station Howard Stern is at in Private Parts. 

In 1998, Keith got a call from Flint, Michigan to come work at a fairly new country station, WFBE-FM (B-95).  In 2002, the station changed management and he travelled across town to WKCQ-FM.  He continued his career in country music at WCEN-FM (The Moose), which was a powerhouse station that covered 27 counties in the state.  He returned to WFBE-FM to do mornings after a 5 year stay at the Moose.  After another management change, and another firing, Keith decided to go back to school to learn another trade.   

He began working as a part-time personality on WCRZ-FM (Cars 108) in Flint.  An opportunity to actually program a station came in 2009.  He became program director of 103.9 The Fox (WRSR-FM) until the station was sold.  He returned to WCRZ-FM part time, as well as doing part time work again for The Moose.  He remained at both places until the Covid-19 pandemic.  While technically still employed at both stations, he has been off the air since March. 

He currently works full time as a Polysomnographic Technologist at a Sleep Evaluations Center.  He helps to diagnose Sleep Apnea in adults and children.

  1. Why did you want to be a DJ?

    When I was in high school, I was a band nerd.  I loved playing in band and actually aspired to be a band director.  During my senior year, I worked part time at a boat marina in the Parts Department.  In the fall and winter, once the boats were winterized, business was slow.  So I would sit in there with the radio on and do inventory.  I would listen to Jim McKenzie on Kiss-FM every day.  He was a great example of what a DJ should be – the listener’s friend.  Every day I listened, and I felt like he was talking to just me.  He kept me company while I worked.  The more I listened to him and other DJ’s, the more I began to think, “Hey, I could do that!  I’d enjoy doing that!”  I called the station and asked to speak to someone about getting into the business.  The guy I spoke with told me that I could 1) go to broadcast school or 2) intern at the station for a while and see if I could break in that way.  I chose Option #2. 

    I started interning for the news guy.  I took news stories off the wire and rewrote stories and helped compile a newscast.  I then began hanging out with the morning show (Paul Christy and the Christy Critters).  I enjoyed this so much more.  This was where the real action was.  I got to see them plan bits, edit phone calls, and more.  Eventually, I started running Paul’s Saturday show, which was all on tape.  He would throw it to me from the tape and ask about the sport scores, lottery numbers, and weather.  I did this for about 6 months and they let the overnight guy go.  I was asked to fill in on the show temporarily.  The temporary job ended up being full time.  Paul believed I had some talent (although not much of it showed during my time there) and gave me my first break in radio.

  2. Who was your personal favorite DJ and what did you like about that DJ.?

    It’s hard to pick just one, because there really are so many.  If I had to narrow it down, I’d say on a national scale – Wolfman Jack.  He was just so fun to listen to and he always said some of the coolest stuff.  I used to close my show with one of his quotes:  “Keep smiling.  A smile is just a light in the window letting people know your heart’s at home.”  I thought that was just awesome!

    Local DJ, would have to be Richard D from Honey Radio. I really found him to be a great mentor and teacher.  He and I loved the same bad jokes and used to make fun of each other all the time on the radio.  His show had daily benchmarks, which were so reminiscent of the “good old days” of radio when DJ’s were truly personalities.  He branded everything.  When somebody won a contest, he would “Richard D-clare” them the winner.  He always played an obscure record every day called the “Tricky Dicky Off The Wall Record” (he had a whole intro to this).  He’d read celebrity birthdays and history bits from his “Poor Richard D’s Almanac,” and so much more.  He ALWAYS sounded like he was having fun and I really tried to do the same thing.  He really was one of the best!

  3. How did the business change from the time you began until the time you ended your career?

    When I first got into radio, I feel like I was spoiled.  We had a lot of freedom.  We were creative and got to do a lot of bits on the air.  Again, radio was still a place that people went to hear music, but also enjoyed listening to what the DJ’s had to say.  Johnny Molson, who I followed on the air at WKSG, did some fantastic “theater of the mind” bits and had fun with them!

    Somewhere in the early 90’s, research started to say that DJ’s talked too much.  “More Music” became a thing, and DJ’s were told to shut up and read the cards.  To ensure that DJ’s kept it short, there were liner cards placed in the studios for us to read.  Talk breaks were eliminated and when we did talk it was to 1) outro the song, 2) read the liner card, 3) promote what was coming up next, and 4) play the commercials. 

    In truth, as another great mentor told me, it wasn’t that DJ’s talked too much – it was that they didn’t have anything to say.  Jay Trachman helped me to take a bit, write it out to where it all fit together and you didn’t waste the listener’s time.  Bits had a “catch” or a “hook” to peak your interest, then the “meat” of the bit, followed by the “out” or the “punchline”.  Short – to the point – and still entertaining. 

  4. How much control did you have on the playlist?

    Today – none.  You can bet that 99% of all stations have their music scheduled in advance.

    When I first started, our station was “all request.”  We had a computer in the studio and as long as the song met criteria, we could pretty much play whatever listeners asked for.  It was a pretty cool thing.  We had to check and make sure that the song hadn’t been played before we got on the air or that it wasn’t scheduled later in the show.  Even request shows today only have a few spots for request.  Music is scheduled ahead of time.

    When I was playing current music, in country, I had the chance to voice an opinion about which new song I thought we should add to the play list.  It was something that the Music Director, Program Director, and consultant made decisions on.

  5. Is there one song you had to play that sticks out as one you really disliked?

    I could probably name one song from every station I worked at!  While at country radio it was almost every song Rascal Flatts put out after their first album…LOL.  They all began to sound the same to me.  It always bothered me that stations would add new songs from “super stars” even though they knew the song was a piece of garbage.

    Anyway, I digress.  The one song that sticks out to me is The Boll Weevil Song by Brook Benton.  It seemed like this always played on Honey.  I’m not sure why it aggravated me so much, but I actually said how much I disliked it on the air.  Johnny Molson once talked about The Elusive Butterfly by Bob Lind saying, “It sounds like someone ate a Hallmark card and threw up” regarding the lyrics.

    I think all DJ’s have their favorite songs and ones they hate.  That’s why there is volume control in the on air studio … I turned the speakers down a lot!

  6. Of the musicians you met or interviewed- which one impressed you the most?

    In almost 30 years, I have met so many.  Let me say that country artists are usually the most generous and gracious.  I found that to be true with 95% of them.  George Strait, Wynonna Judd, Emily West, Jeff Bates, Reba McEntire, and SO many were just like talking to friends.  They were just amazing. 

    Martina McBride impressed me the most.  I was escorting a backstage winner to her show.  She had bid like $700 on a silent auction package to see Martina, get a limo ride to the show, backstage passes, and dinner.  The auction was for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.  I introduced the winner to Martina and told her about our winner.  When she heard that she had bid that much money to be there, she called someone over to her and whispered something to them.  Martina was so nice to this winner.  She autographed everything that the winner had with her, including the T-shirts she bought at the merchandise booth.  Her guy came back with a bunch of items and gave them to our winner.  There was a huge autographed window poster (like you would see in record stores), key chains, more T-shirts, bumper stickers, and all things Martina – almost all autographed.  THEN she gave the listener her money back for the shirts she had bought before the show.  She thanked the listener for being such a supporter of St. Jude and our station.  Most meet and greets are very quick, but Martina gave this winner almost 15 minutes.  It was truly amazing and speaks volumes for who Martina is.

  7. Who was the best/worst interview?

    Again, I have done so many great in person and telephone interviews, it is hard to pick the “best.”  In the running would be Rainn Wilson (Dwight from the Office), as he was very funny and was familiar with our area.  Also up near the top – Elmo from Sesame Street.  That was such a hoot.  I’m not even sure why we had him on the show, but Kevin Clash, who is the voice of Elmo, called and he had a very deep voice.  We chatted for a sec before the interview and BAM – there was Elmo!  My oldest son was about 2 when I did this interview and Kevin recorded a special message for him as Elmo and sent a stuffed Elmo to him at our home!  Pretty cool.  I also played poker with Chely Wright on the air as part of our interview because she took my money at a charity event and I told her I wanted a chance to win it back… LOL

    Toss up for the top spot – Aaron Tippin and Jewel.  Aaron was just amazing.  He was in for a show and was a blast to talk to.  He bleeds red, white, and blue!  He shared some great stories from on the road and he shared his mutual love for the music of Sinatra and Dean Martin. 

    Jewel, was a sweetheart.  She was live with me in the studio promoting her country album and show.  Her life is just so fascinating that it was easy to talk with her.  I asked if there was anything off limits, because I didn’t know if she really wanted to talk about the fact that she was living out of her van for a while.  She told me to ask whatever I wanted.  We talked about her poetry, her life in Alaska, her family, her hobbies, her pop albums, and a small role she had in a Wizard of Oz show.  I felt like I knew her all my life.  She was such a joy to hang out with. After she left, about an hour later, her record rep who was with her called me and told me that she said our interview was one of the best she had ever done.  She had told him I made her feel so at home. 

    I still have a voice mail on my cell phone from her telling me she would see me at her show that night. The show she was doing that night was about an hour and a half away from me and I had tickets.  However, there was a snow storm and I was unable to get out of the driveway to make it up to the show. 

  8. How would you respond if an interviewee accidentally swore during a live broadcast?

    Most stations are equipped with an “oops” button just for this reason.  The live feed of a station is usually broadcast on a five second delay.  So if someone swears, you hit the button and it jumps ahead to the live feed and eventually goes back to 5 seconds.  Yes, I have had to use this on occasion.  Most folks don’t hear when it happens, but a radio guy can tell when the button was pressed.

    That’s why most interviews are recorded.  When an interview is recorded, you can edit out stuff you don’t necessarily want in the interview.  You can also save it in pieces and play each piece over an hour or so and it sounds like the artist is hanging with you for an hour, when in reality, they were on the phone with you for 10-15 minutes.  We recorded the majority of our interviews whether they were in studio or on the phone.  Some, however, were broadcast live.

  9. Was there any difference between being a DJ at a Country Station and a Rock Station besides the music?

    First of all, your audience is different.  Your target demo for a Country station is usually women aged 25-54.  Your target for a Classic Rock station is men around that same age group or older.  So when you prep for a show, you cater how you prep to those demos. 

    Country stations really focus on artist stuff.  We had a few prep services that had all kinds of stories and sound bites from country singers about writing songs, awards, their favorite recipe, etc…  Country artists, especially current artists, always have something going on – a tour, a book, a new album, etc…  With Classic Rock (just like oldies) the music doesn’t change.  You are a “gold” based format.  You are playing only hits that have been around for decades.  Many artists have passed away.  So you talk about the songs themselves, the stories behind the songs (much like Max does in his blog), maybe a new biography, or a movie where a song is featured. 

    Depending on WHO you are talking to, you prepare a show for that.  You could talk about deer hunting on a rock station, where as you would probably talk about a deer widow’s weekend on a country station.  You have to know who your audience is and you go from there.

    Another thing that was different for me was my vocal delivery.  I found myself to be very conversational, but energetic on the country station.  On the rock station, it was different.  We didn’t talk up a lot of intros, so I was often talking with no music going behind me.  This allowed me to slow my delivery down a bit (not quite Johnny Fever or Venus Flytrap) and it was a bit more “me,” if that makes any sense….LOL

  10. Keith, what is your most memorable moment on radio?

    I have three that I will never forget.  The first was our St. Jude Radiothons.  I had been to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis.  Touring the hospital, hearing the stories, seeing all that they do, and then coming back presenting it all to our listeners was quite an emotional experience.  I was lucky to meet two children whose family benefited from St. Jude and interview them on the air – Kyle and Allyson made an impact on me and our listeners.

    The other was the last day that Honey Radio was on the air.  That day in November of 1994, we did our morning show, and then turned it over to Boogie Brian, who was the last live jock from our studio.  I recently went back and listened to the last break I did.  It is hard to listen to.  I felt like I could ad lib it, I wish I had written something down.  I was holding back tears through the whole break.  Then, when Boogie played his prerecorded 15 minute sign off, we all sat in a production room listening.  We all cried.  One of the most emotional days of my life, second only to ….

    9/11.  The planes hit the Twin Towers before I went on the air at 10am.  That day, I was the eyes and ears of what developments were happening for my listeners.  I remember the disbelief.  I remember the fear.  I remember the vivid visuals we saw on the news.  Life changed that day for all of us and radio changed too.  We began playing the National Anthem every day at noon.  We had numerous appearances where we raised money for victim’s families.  We sponsored blood drives and so much more.  The events of that day and literally throwing the format out the window to broadcast the latest information will stick with me forever.

  11. What is your most embarrassing moment on the radio?

    I always say that I broadcast the worst five minutes of radio in Detroit Radio History:  Short set up:  My morning show partner, Rob, did a ton of voices.  These characters were all part of the show and I was usually the guy who tried to keep the show (and them) in check.  So, the week Honey went off the air, Rob insisted I do a voice live on the air.  I had done it a couple times, but had recorded it.  The character was “Mitch Wallace”, who was loosely based on a real listener who called us all the time.  I had called Rob at home and used that voice and he said it was so good, he thought the guy had his number!  This particular day we had a stupid bit planned.  I was to enter the studio as “Mitch”.  I was to be upset about the station going off the air.  (Keep in mind this is long before school shootings and active shooters) I was to have a gun and Chuckie the bouncer (based on Charles Bronson) was going to beat me (Mitch) up and throw me out the window and we would then go into commercials.  For the theater of the mind, this bit required some sound effects.  Now, if only it had gone as smoothly as I described.…….

    We had 6 cart (tape) machines. Each machine played a different thing.   In #1 was the song we were talking out of.  In #2 was the gunshot sound.  #3 had the “fight scene” sounds (which were from an old western and had corny music playing underneath the fight).  #4 had the glass breaking.  #5 had the door slam for Chuckie’s exit and #6 had the first commercial.    I had NEVER done the character live before.  So when I did, I saw Rob start to chuckle, and that is all it took for me to start to lose it.  From there on, it spirals out of control.  We both began to laugh hard.  I was laughing so much, I had tears in my eyes and couldn’t see the board in front of me to push the buttons to start the commercial (because by this time, it was obvious we couldn’t do the bit).  We laughed all the way through the commercial set.  Rob insists that we can do it so out of the commercial break, we decide to try again.  As soon as I start to do the Mitch character, I started laughing again.  I said to Rob (and the entire listening audience) “Aw, hell, forget it!”  We were going to do the weather out of the bit this time, featuring our Scottish weatherman Lucky McCloud (another Rob voice). The first thing I did after laughing was cue up the bagpipe music we played when he did the weather….miraculously, Rob was able to jump into the Lucky character and eventually the bit happened on the air…..it was a long way to go for something that was probably only funny to us, but it remains one of my favorite moments on air with him.  It was also probably the most embarrassing.

     

  12. WKRP, what about it is realistic and what is not?

    LOL – DJ’s and other radio people get asked this a lot! I guess it depends on who you ask. Here are my thoughts –

    Are there sales people like Herb?  Yes.  Are they as annoying?  Yes!

    Are all news people like Les?  No, but there are plenty other folks in the biz like him. 

    Do all stations have a sexy secretary/receptionist?  Some of the stations I worked at did. 

    Are all General Managers like Mr. Carlson?  No, some are actually quite bright and know their stuff.

    Do DJ’s usually give their program directors (like Andy) a headache?  Yes.  Very much so!

    Do Programmers and General Managers often not see eye to eye on what’s going on with the station?  Many times this is true. 

    Can you get fired for saying “booger” on the air?  I don’t think so.  We spent an entire morning talking about how those green raisins look like boogers and we weren’t fired.

    Do many DJ’s have big egos like Venus and weird idiosyncrasies like Johnny?  Yes, and you know it almost immediately when you meet them.

    In many ways, WKRP is very realistic and while radio people probably find the show funnier than the average viewer, we also find one thing particularly annoying – the DJ’s don’t wear headphones in the studio.  When a DJ turns on the microphone, the speakers in the studio shut off so there is no feedback.  The DJ can hear the music and his/her voice in the headphones, so they know when to stop talking.  These guys never seem to have headphones on and it has always bothered me. 

    They also seem to have the uncanny ability to throw a record on the turntable and have the song cued up immediately.  I never had to spin vinyl until I moved to the west side of the state.  I can tell you, you have to put the needle on the start of the groove, play it through a small cue speaker and wait for the song to start.  You then stop it and turn the record back a ¼ turn, so that when you hit start, it plays at the right speed and doesn’t wind up to it.  Carts are a whole lot easier, but almost all the music on WKRP is on vinyl.

  13. When did radio start to change in your eyes?

    I think radio has always been changing.  What I look back on as the “good old days” of radio are not for those who were in it long before I was.  If I had to pick the moment it changed for the worse in my career, it would be the late 1990’s.  Bill Clinton signed the Telecommunications Act of 1996 which lifted the “cap” on radio station ownership.  This led to many of the locally owned stations to be bought up by the big radio corporations like Cumulus, Clear Channel, and Citadel. 

    With less owners and more corporate control, music programming was dictated by those corporate programmers.  So music playlists became smaller – which meant you were hearing the same songs more often.  It also meant that some markets were not hearing local bands.  Can you imagine Detroit NOT playing any Motown artists, Bob Seger, or Kid Rock!? 

    With automation technology, the ability to record ahead of time became a thing.  I remember a few times where I was “on air” and listening to myself as I drove to a wedding I was DJing.  With big corporations trying to save money, they began eliminating DJ’s.  They were replaced by syndication or DJ’s from other markets who were recording shows from their home market.  Today, it is rare to find a station with more than one live LOCAL DJ.  When you do, it is usually a locally owned station. 

    When I was in radio, the fear was that Sirius XM radio was going to be the death of terrestrial radio.  In truth, terrestrial radio killed itself from the inside with automation and consolidation.  I guess the more I think about it, going back to question #13 … If I could bring back something from the past, it would be the way radio used to be, because terrestrial radio today is just sad to listen to.

  14. If you could reach back in time and revive things that DJs used to do, say or play on the air, what would you bring back?

    DJ’s used to have a big say in music.  Many of them were playing singles on 45 on the air.  So many hits from the 50’s and 60’s became hits because a DJ decided to spin “the other side” of the record because they liked it.  Elvis and the Beatles had “two-sided hits” because DJ’s played both sides.  I wish that DJ’s today had a little bigger part in selecting music for airplay.  They really don’t – I will explain that in the answer to your next question.

  15. Why do stations play only a few select songs from a band to death while ignoring their other songs?

There are a lot of factors involved in this, but the simple answer is because of music testing and consultants. 

Back in the 80’s and 90’s that had a format called “Album Oriented Rock” or AOR.  These stations tended to play deeper cuts or songs that weren’t necessarily “singles”.  This format really doesn’t exist anymore, at least the way it was back then. 

So what is a single?  It is the song from an album that record companies (and sometimes artists) believe would be a hit.  It is a song that will get lots of airplay and sell the album.  It is a song that they feel is “the hit.”  Most albums have 3-4 singles and then there is a new album.  The songs that were not released as singles don’t get any airplay. 

Music testing happens in all formats.  It happens with old and new songs.  They usually do it in an auditorium.  They get an audience of various ages and genders and play them 500-1000 “hooks” of songs.  These hooks are the 15 seconds of a song that are most recognizable.  They audience then rates the song.  Is it played too much?  Is it played too little?  Do you love it?  Do you hate it?  Is it offensive? Etc…The data collected from these music tests can help a consultant decide what songs his stations need to be playing and which ones need to go away.

With new music, it works the same way.  If listeners like the song and the test scores are high, that song will get more plays.  If the songs tests bad, it will get less plays on the play list or just go away all together. 

If you have any questions for Keith you can go to the link below and ask away! He also elaborates on this last question on the link below. 

Here is a link to Keith’s post about this topic.

 

Famous Rock Guitars Part 3

Now we continue our quest of famous guitars and the artists cherish them… Here was Part 1  and Part 2.

Bruce Springsteen and  Neil Young’s guitars

Bruce Springsteen’s Guitar

Bruce has stuck with this guitar from the first album until now. You see this guitar on his Born to Run album. When I saw him in 2000 he was playing it. Bruce bought this in 1972 in Phil Petillo’s Neptune New Jersey guitar shop for $185. Now the guitar  is said to be worth between $1 million and $5 million…pretty good investment Bruce!

The guitar is a composite assembled from parts from at least two other Fender guitars. The bolt-on neck dates from a 1950s Fender Esquire guitar. The Esquire decal on the headstock indicates that the neck came from the single-pickup variant of Fender’s more-popular two-pickup Telecaster. The body is a 1950’s Telecaster

The guitar had been originally owned by a record company and was part of the payola scams of the 1960s. It was rigged with four pickups wired into extra jacks that would each plug into a separate channel on the recording console.

Petillo removed the extra pickups and returned the guitar to original Telecaster shape before he sold it Springsteen, but a huge side effect of the routing was that the Tele was now really light, giving it a sound a feel unlike any other.

Bruce had Peillo modify it over the years. He added his  triangular Precision Frets, a six saddle titanium bridge, and custom hot-wound waterproofed pickups and electronics so they could better survive a sweat-soaked 4 hour show.

Bruce has now retired the Esquire from road duty, so these days Springsteen plays clones on stage, but still records with the original.

Neil Young’s “Old Black”

Neil Young is known mostly as a singer songwriter but he is a hell of a guitar player. He is one of my favorite rock guitarists. He doesn’t play lightning quick and that is a good thing…it’s playing with feel that many guitar players forget about.

Neil Young acquired Old Black in 1968 through a trade with Buffalo Springfield member Jim Messina, who traded Old Black for one of Young’s orange Gretsch guitars (Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins).

The guitar made a humming sound so he dropped it off at a guitar shop in LA. When he came back, the shop had closed for good and lost one of the pickups. To replace the lost pickup, Neil added a Gretsh pickup that didn’t quite sound the way he wanted, but it stayed that way until Larry Cragg found an old Firebird pickup and installed it. Then Old Black was restored to its former glory and that Firebird pickup is still installed on the guitar today. It was roughly resprayed to jet black, and received a new Tune-o-matic bridge (not available when the guitar was produced) and a B-7 model Bigsby vibrato tailpiece.

The neck pickup has always been the original P-90 pickup, but it is covered by a metal P-90 cover. Neil is still playing Old Black to this day and he said he will until he dies.

Green Day – Warning

I mentioned this song a few days ago about how the intro sounds a lot like The Kinks Picture Book. It’s a good song that was on their album of the same name.

That song peaked at #31 in the Billboard 100 and #27 in the UK in 2000. Green Day recorded Warning at Studio 880 in Oakland. The facility was directly beneath a freeway, and, according to Billie Joe, each time a truck passed overhead “you could feel the console vibrating.”

The album peaked at #4 in the Billboard Album Charts, #2 in Canada, and #4 in the UK in 2000.  The lead single Minority spent over a month at the top of the Billboard Modern Rock chart. The album was a turning point for Green Day as they introduced a sax, harmonica, and mandolin and limited Billy Joe’s distorted solos. Punk fans didn’t like the change but it setup their huge next album American Idiot that was released in 2004.

From Songfacts

This song is about how rules are made to be broken and warnings can be ignored. You live your own life, you make your own choices. Says bass player Mike Dirnt: “You gotta make your own decisions and choices. It’s not so much about what to think, it’s just to think. Question everything.”

Warning

This is a public service announcement
This is only a test
Emergency evacuation protest
May impair your ability to operate machinery
Can’t quite tell just what it means to me
Keep out of reach of children
Don’t you talk to strangers
Get your philosophy from a bumper sticker

Warning, live without warning
I say a warning, live without warning
Without, Alright

Better homes and safety-sealed communities
Did you remember to pay the utilities?
Caution: police line: you better not cross
Is the cop or am I the one that’s
Really dangerous?
Sanitation, Expiration date, Question everything
Or shut up and be a victim of authority

Warning, live without warning
I say a warning, live without warning
I say a warning, live without warning
I say a warning, live without warning
Without Alright!

Better homes and safety-sealed communities
Did you remember to pay the utilities?

Caution: police line: you better not cross
Is the cop or am I the one that’s
Really dangerous?
Sanitation, Expiration date, Question everything
Or shut up and be a victim of authority

Warning, live without warning
I say a warning, live without warning
I say a warning, live without warning
I say a warning, live without warning

This is a public service announcement
This is only a test

The Clarks – Better Off Without You ….Power Pop Friday

This band keeps popping back up in my playlist. Lately in power pop I’ve been listening to Sloan and The Clarks. They complement each other well.

This is a local band out of Pittsburgh that formed in  the mid 80s at  Indiana University of Pennsylvania where most of them were enrolled. They started out as a cover band and soon began playing original songs.

The song was on Let It Go, the fifth studio album by The Clarks, released on June 20, 2000. The album outsold many major national releases in the Pittsburgh area and generated huge local radio hits.

The band still has all of the original members and are going strong.

Better Off Without You

You are sultry, dirty, soft and hard
You are close to me and you’re so far
And I’m thinking of the time we spent together
Now I’ll bury this in my backyard
Sometimes I sit and wonder
But I’ll never dial your number ’cause

I’m having fun looking out for number one
And I’m doing all the things I like to do
I’m having fun ’cause I knew it all along
I’d be better off without you

You are guilty, pretty, high and low
You’re a place to stay and a time to go
And I’m searching through the things you left behind here
Now it’s time for me to let it go
Sometimes I sit and wonder
But I’ll never dial that number ’cause

I’m having fun looking out for number one
And I’m doing all the things I like to do
I’m having fun ’cause I knew it all along
I’d be better off without you

Late at night you pick up the telephone
Call me up and cry ’cause you’re all alone I don’t care
Apologize for taking my cigarettes
Now it’s time to feel all the side effects
Missing the life you had

AC/DC – Shot In The Dark

It’s good to know somethings just don’t change. This could have been recorded in 1980 and we would not have known. We need consistent things in life and AC/DC gives that to us.

This is a new sneak peak single off of their upcoming album.

Well…they continue their tradition of a riff and a few chords and it works every single time. Brian Johnson, Cliff Williams, and Phil Rudd are back with them and they are coming out with a new album called…Power Up.

The album will contain unreleased songs that were written by Angus and his late brother  Malcolm, who died in 2017.

“This record is pretty much a dedication to Malcolm, my brother,” Angus Young said… “It’s a tribute for him like ‘Back in Black’ was a tribute to Bon Scott.”

Here is a youtube comment I had to copy over:

And ACDC came back to save the world.

Shot In The Dark

[Verse 1]
I need a pick me up
A Rollin’ Thunder truck
I need a shot of you
That tattooed lady wild
Like a mountain lion
I got a hunger, that’s the loving truth

[Pre-Chorus]
You got a long night coming
And a long night pumping
You got the right position
The heat of transmission

[Chorus]
A shot in the dark
Make you feel alright
A shot in the dark
All through the whole night
A shot in the dark
Yeah, electric sparks
A shot in the dark
Beats a walk in the park, yeah

[Verse 2]
Blast it on the radio
Breaking on the TV show
Send it out on all the wires
And if I didn’t know any better
Your mission is to party
Till the broad daylight

[Pre-Chorus]
You got a long night coming
And a long night going
You got the right position
The heat of transmission

[Chorus]
A shot in the dark
Make you feel alright
A shot in the dark
All through the whole night
A shot in the dark
Yeah, elеctric sparks
A shot in the dark
Beats a walk in the park, yеah

[Bridge]
My mission is to hit ignition

[Chorus]
A shot in the dark
Make you feel alright
A shot in the dark
All through the whole night
A shot in the dark
Yeah, electric sparks
A shot in the dark
Beats a walk in the park, yeah

John Hiatt – Window On The World

I hope everyone is having a wonderful Sunday so far…I heard this song and liked it right away. Jimmy Buffett did a cover but I prefer John’s rawer version.

It came out in 2003 on the album “Beneath This Gruff Exterior” which peaked at #73 on the Billboard Album Charts.  I don’t see any chart history on this song. John’s reputation has always been better than his chart success but other artists have covered his songs with great chart success…Bonnie Raitt being one.

John mentions “Wes and Jimmy” and that would be Jazz musicians Wes Montgomery and Jimmy Smith.

Further Adventures of Jimmy & Wes: Smith, Jimmy, Montgomery, Wes:  4988005713223: Amazon.com: Books

This song really spoke to me the first time I heard it. It wasn’t a massive hit but occasionally I’ll hear it on radio.

Window On The World

A broken promise i kept too long
A greasy shade and a curtain drawn
A broken glass and a heart gone wrong
That’s my window on the world

A cup of coffee in a shaky hand
Wakin’ up in a foreign land
Tryin’ to act like i got somethin’ planned
That’s my window on the world

[Chorus 1:]
That’s my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
Don’t let mama cut those curfs
That’s my window on the world

In broad daylight that circus tent pulled up stakes
I don’t know where it went
A close dark room with a busted vent
That’s my window on the world

I think about you when i’m countin’ sheep
I think about you, then i can’t sleep
I think that ocean is just so deep
That’s my window on the world

[Chorus 2:]
That’s my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
The queen of Sheba meets the duke of earle
That’s my window on the world

Down on indiana avenue
Wes and jimmy, man they played the blues
I guess they were only passin’ through
That’s my window on the world

[Chorus 1:]
That’s my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
Don’t let mama cut those curfs
That’s my window on the world

[Chorus 2:]
That’s my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
The queen of Sheba meets the duke of earle
That’s my window on the world