Rolling Stones – Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)

One of my favorite intros to any song.  Billy Preston did a  funky clavinet intro that sounds dark and huge. Mick Taylor’s solo on this song is perfect…without Mick Taylor they would have made those stretch of albums in the late sixties and early seventies but they would have sounded different. When Mick Taylor quit…they lost their sound from this period.

The song peaked at #15 in the Billboard 100 in 1974. It was on the great album Goats Head Soup which peaked at #1 in 1973.

 

From Songfacts

This tells two stories, a young man shot by police in a case of mistaken identity, and a 10-year girl who dies in an alley of a drug overdose. Neither is based on a true story, but is a commentary on urban America.

The horns were arranged by trumpet player Jim Price, who along with Bobby Keys on sax, provided the brass on records and tours for The Stones in the early ’70s. This was the last time Price recorded with The Stones. He went on to produce other artists, including Joe Cocker.

Keith Richards played bass and shared lead guitar duties with Mick Taylor.

Billy Preston played the piano.

The Stones played this on their 1973 European tour, even though it describes events in America.

Chuck Findley played trumpet on this. Other artists he worked for include George Harrison, Quincy Jones, Diana Ross, the Carpenters, Julio Iglesias, Rod Stewart, Robert Palmer and Madonna.

Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo Heartbreaker

The police in New York City 
They chased a boy right through the park 
And in a case of mistaken identity 
The put a bullet through his heart 

Heart breakers with your forty four 
I want to tear your world apart 
You heart breaker with your forty four 
I want to tear your world a part 

A ten year old girl on a street corner 
Sticking needles in her arm 
She died in the dirt of an alleyway 
Her mother said she had no chance, no chance! 

Heart breaker, heart breaker 
She stuck the pins right in her heart 
Heart breaker, pain maker 
Stole the love right out of you heart

Oh yeah, oh yeah
Want to tear your world apart
Oh yeah, oh yeah
Want to tear your world apart

Heart breaker, heart breaker 
You stole the love right out of my heart 
Heart breaker, heart breaker 
I want to tear that world 
I want to tear that world 
I want to tear that world apart

Heart breaker, heart breaker 
Stone love, stone love
Oh yeah, oh yeah

Heartbreaker, heartbreaker
Want to tear that world apart

Doo, doo doo doo doo doo doo, doo doo doo

Rolling Stones – Salt Of The Earth

Hope everyone had a great long weekend.

Let’s drink to the hard-working people
Let’s drink to the lowly of birth
Raise your glass to the good and the evil
Let’s drink to the salt of the earth

This song is on the great album Beggars Banquet. I had this album and it remains one of my favorite albums by the Stones. There is not a bad song on the LP. This one and Prodigal Son I always liked. Beggars Banquet peaked at #5 on the Billboard album charts in 1969.

Keith and Mick Jagger both sing on this with the  Los Angeles Watts Street Gospel Choir singing background…Nicky Hopkins is on piano.

The title refers to the working class…they are “The salt of the Earth.” Jagger later said: “The song is total cynicism. I’m saying those people haven’t any power and they never will have.” 

From Songfacts

This was one of Keith Richards’ first lead vocal performances for The Stones (his first was on “Something Happened To Me Yesterday” from Between The Buttons). 

The Stones played this on Rock and Roll Circus, a British TV special The Stones taped in 1968 but never aired because they were upstaged by other acts on the show. A series of musical acts and circus performances, it was released on video in 1995.

The Stones performed this in Atlantic City in 1989 with Axl Rose and Izzy Stradlin of Guns N’ Roses on vocals.

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards performed this at the 2001 “Concert For New York,” which honored the rescue workers, cops, and firefighters in New York City after the World Trade Center disaster.

Salt Of The Earth

Let’s drink to the hard working people
Let’s drink to the lowly of birth
Raise your glass to the good and the evil
Let’s drink to the salt of the earth

Say a prayer for the common foot soldier
Spare a thought for his back breaking work
Say a prayer for his wife and his children
Who burn the fires and who still till the earth

And when I search a faceless crowd
A swirling mass of gray and
Black and white
They don’t look real to me
In fact, they look so strange

Raise your glass to the hard working people
Let’s drink to the uncounted heads
Let’s think of the wavering millions
Who need leaders but get gamblers instead

Spare a thought for the stay-at-home voter
His empty eyes gaze at strange beauty shows
And a parade of the gray suited grafters
A choice of cancer or polio

And when I look in the faceless crowd
A swirling mass of grays and
Black and white
They don’t look real to me
Or don’t they look so strange

Let’s drink to the hard working people
Let’s think of the lowly of birth
Spare a thought for the rag taggy people
Let’s drink to the salt of the earth

Let’s drink to the hard working people
Let’s drink to the salt of the earth
Let’s drink to the two thousand million
Let’s think of the humble of birth

Rolling Stones – All Down The Line

One of my favorites off of Exile on Main Street. This was going to be the first single off of the album but Tumbling Dice… understandably was the first. This song didn’t chart but it just added to the greatness that is Exile on Main Street.

Engineer Andy Johns talked about this single. It was the first song finished for the album and Mick thought it was perfect for the first single. Andy disagreed and told Mick. I know this is a long quote but it’s worth a read. It shows you how much power some bands like the Stones had in the 60s and 70s.

Andy Johns:

“It was the first one that was finished cause we’d be working for months and months. Mick got very enamored. ‘It’s finished! It’s going to be the single!’ I thought, ‘This isn’t really a single, you know.’ I remember going out and talking to him and he was playing the piano. ‘Mick, this isn’t a single. It doesn’t compare to “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” or “Street Fighting Man.” ‘Come on, man.’ He went, ‘Really? Do you think so?’ I thought, ‘My God. He’s actually listening to me.’ (laughs). And then, I was having a struggle with the mix I thought was gonna be it. Ahmet Ertegun then barged in with a bunch of hookers and ruined the one mix. He stood right in front of the left speaker with two birds on each arm (laughs).
I told Mick, ‘I can’t hear it here. If I could hear it on the radio that would be nice.’ It was just a fantasy. ‘Oh, we can do that.’ ‘Stew (piano player Ian Stewart), go to the nearest FM radio station with the tape and say we’d like to hear it over the radio. And we’ll get a limo and Andy can listen to it in the car.’ I went, ‘Bloody hell…Well, it’s the Stones. OK.’
So sure enough, we’re touring down Sunset Strip and Keith is in one seat, and I’m in the back where the speakers are with Mick, and Charlie is in there, too. Just because he was bored (laughs). And Mick’s got the radio on and the DJ comes on the air, ‘We’re so lucky tonight. We’re the first people to play the new Stones’ record.’ And it came on the radio and the speakers in this car were kind of shot. I still couldn’t tell. And it finishes. Then Mick turns around. ‘So?’ ‘I’m still not sure, man.’ I’m still not used to these speakers’. ‘Oh, we’ll have him play it again then.’
Poor Stew. ‘Have them play it again’ like they were some sort of radio service. It was surreal. Up and down Sunset Strip at 9:00 on a Saturday night. The Strip was jumpin’ and I’m in the car with those guys listening to my mixes. It sounded OK. ‘I think we’re down with that.’ So then we moved on.”

From Songfacts

When The Stones gave this to a Los Angeles radio station in 1971 while they were still working on it so they could hear what it sounded like on the radio, it spread rumors that it would be the first single off Exile on Main St., but that honor went to “Tumblin’ Dice.”

Producer Jimmy Miller added percussion. He had to play some of the instruments on the album because The Stones were rarely together during the sessions, which took place at a French villa Keith Richards rented.

Kathi McDonald sang backup. She was a backup singer for Leon Russell and went on to record with Nicky Hopkins and Quicksilver Messenger Service.

All Down The Line

Yeah, heard the diesel drumming all down the line.
Oh, heard the wires a humming all down the line.
Yeah, hear the women sighing all down the line.
Oh, hear the children crying all down the line.

(All down the line)
We’ll be watching out for trouble, yeah.
(All down the line)
And we’d better keep the motor running, yeah.
(All down the line)
Well, you can’t say yes and you can’t say no,
Just be right there when the whistle blows.
I need a sanctified girl with a sanctified mind to help me now.

Yeah, all the people singing all down the line.
Mmmm, watch the men all working, working, yeah.
(All down the line)

(All down the line)
We’re gonna open up the throttle yeah.
(All down the line)
We’re gonna bust another bottle, yeah.
(All down the line)

I need a shot of salvation, baby, once in a while.
Hear the whistle blowing, hear it for a thousand miles.

(All down the line)
We’re gonna open up the throttle, yeah.
All down the line, we’re gonna bust another bottle, yeah.
Well you can’t say yes, and you can’t say no,
Just be right there when the whistle blows.
I need a sanctified mind to help me out right now.

Be my little baby for a while.
Won’t you be my little baby for a while?
Won’t you be my little baby for a while?
Won’t you be my little baby for a while?
Won’t you be my little baby for a while?

Rolling Stones – Time Is On My Side

I remember back in 1981 when the Stones were touring across America. This song was released from the tour with a great version of Twenty Flight Rock. I bought the singles Going to a Go-Go and this one, the live album (Still Life) and then I saw the video Let’s Spend The Night Together. It was going to be the LAST tour of the Stones…uh yeah

The song was written by  Jerry Ragovoy (using the pseudonym “Norman Meade”). The song was originally released by the Stones in 1964 and it peaked at #6 in the Billboard 100. This is one of the very few songs that I prefer the live version to the studio version in 1964.

Keith Richards said of this song: “In America we were basically known for heavy, slowish kind of ballads. ‘Time Is On My Side,’ ‘Tell Me,’ ‘Heart of Stone,’ that was what we were known for. Strangely enough that was our thing. Every single was a slow song. Who would believe it? You’d think they’d be clamoring for out-and-out rock and roll, but no, it was the soul ballads that happened for us in America.”

From Songfacts

This song was originally recorded by the jazz trombonist Kai Winding and his Orchestra on the Verve Records label in October 1963. His version was mostly instrumental with just the lyric “time is on my side” sung by the background trio of Cissy Houston, Dionne Warwick and Dee Dee Warwick.

The first fully vocal version was recorded by the New Orleans soul singer Irma Thomas; her version was released as the B-side of “Anyone Who Knows What Love Is (Will Understand)” in June 1964. The Rolling Stones released their version of the song in the US on September 26, 1964, and it became their first Top 10 hit in America. Thomas’ version contains a spoken part in the middle that the Stones left out.

The lyrics were most likely written by Jimmy Norman, who was a member of The Coasters. The songwriting credit is unclear, and usually lists Jerry Ragovoy, who wrote “Piece Of My Heart” and “Try” for Janis Joplin, as the only writer, sometimes as “Norman Meade,” which he used as a pseudonym. Thomas’ original single lists the credit as “J. Norman – N. Meade.” Ragovoy, who also produced the song for Thomas, died in 2011 at age 80. 

In this song, Mick Jagger has lost his girl, but he knows it’s just a matter of time until he returns. After all, he’s got “the real love, the kind that you need.”

This was one of two songs The Stones performed on their first Ed Sullivan Show appearance, October 25, 1964. The other was “Around And Around,” a Chuck Berry cover.

That February, The Beatles made their historic debut on Sullivan to crowd hysteria. The Stones hadn’t yet developed a fan base in America, but the teenage girls in the audience still went crazy. The appearance earned them lots of attention and helped send “Time Is On My Side” up the chart – it reached #6 on December 5.

The Stones returned to the show five more times, always earning a wildly enthusiastic greeting from the crowd. On their fifth appearance, they capitulated to Sullivan by changing “Let’s Spend The Night Together” to “Let’s Spend Some Time Together.”

The Rolling Stones released two versions of this song. The US single was recorded in England and is slower, with a gospel organ. The British version was recorded at Chess studios in Chicago.

This song played a key role in the suspense thriller Fallen with Denzel Washington and John Goodman.

Time Is On My Side

Time is on my side, yes it is.
Time is on my side, yes it is.
Now you all were saying that you want to be free
But you’ll come runnin’ back (I said you would baby), 
You’ll come runnin’ back (like I told you so many times before),
You’ll come runnin’ back to me.

Time is on my side, yes it is.
Time is on my side, yes it is.
You’re searching for good times but just wait and see,
You’ll come runnin’ back (I said you would darling), 
You’ll come runnin back (Spent the rest of life with ya baby),
You’ll come runnin’ back to me.

Go ahead baby, go ahead, go ahead and light up the town!
And baby, do anything your heart desires
Remember, I’ll always be around.
And I know, I know like I told you so many times before
You’re gonna come back,
Yeah you’re going to come back baby
Knockin’, knockin’ right on my door.

Time is on my side, yes it is.
Time is on my side, yes it is.
‘Cause I got the real love, the kind that you need.
You’ll come runnin’ back (I knew you would one day), 
You’ll come runnin’ back (Baby I told you before),
You’ll come runnin’ back to me.

Time, time, time is on my side, yes it is.
Time, time, time is on my side, yes it is. 
Time, time, time is on my side

 

Rolling Stones – Ruby Tuesday

I wish this era of the Stones would have lasted longer. Yes, I love the electric blues slanted work they did after this but they wrote some great pop songs. Brian Jones plays the recorder (it sounds like a flute) in this song. You don’t hear much about Brian now but he expanded their sound in the mid-sixties with an array of instruments.

Bill Wyman said that Keith wrote the lyrics and Brian helped finish the melody. This song was the B side to “Let’s Spend The Night Together.”

This song peaked at #1 in the Billboard 100 in 1967.

 

Keith Richards: “That’s one of those things – some chick you’ve broken up with. And all you’ve got left is the piano and the guitar and a pair of panties. And it’s goodbye you know. And so it just comes out of that. And after that, you just build on it. It’s one of those songs that are easiest to write because you’re really right there and you really sort of mean it. And for a songwriter, hey break his heart and he’ll come up with a good song.” 

 

 

From Songfacts

The fourth US #1 hit for the Rolling Stones, this ballad is about a groupie. It may have been inspired by Linda Keith, who was Keith Richards’ girlfriend. Richards said in According to the Rolling Stones: “It was probably written about Linda Keith not being there (laughs). I don’t know, she had pissed off somewhere. It was very mournful, very, VERY Ruby Tuesday and it was a Tuesday.”

Originally, this was called “Title B.”

Keith Richards and Brian Jones wrote most of this, but in keeping with Stones tradition, it was credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Brian Jones was their lead guitarist until he died in 1969, and could play just about any instrument. 

A large double-bass was used. Bill Wyman plucked the notes while Richards played it with a bow.

This was not on the English version of Between The Buttons because it was already released as a single there, and it was customary not to put singles on albums.

This was supposed to be the B-side of “Let’s Spend the Night Together,” but many radio stations shied away from the sexual implications of that song, so they played this instead and made it a hit.

Jagger: “Ruby Tuesday is good. I think that’s a wonderful song. It’s just a nice melody, really. And a lovely lyric. Neither of which I wrote, but I always enjoy singing it.”

The singer Melanie, who had a #1 hit with “Brand New Key” in 1971, released a cover of “Ruby Tuesday” in 1970 that went to #9 in the UK and #52 in the US. Rod Stewart also released a popular cover that was accompanied by a video. His version made #11 in the UK in 1993.

Ruby Tuesday

She would never say where she came from
Yesterday don’t matter if it’s gone
While the sun is bright
Or in the darkest night
No one knows, she comes and goes

Goodbye Ruby Tuesday
Who could hang a name on you?
When you change with every new day
Still I’m gonna miss you

Don’t question why she needs to be so free
She’ll tell you it’s the only way to be
She just can’t be chained
To a life where nothings gained
And nothings lost, at such a cost

Goodbye Ruby Tuesday
Who could hang a name on you?
When you change with every new day
Still I’m gonna miss you

“There’s no time to lose”, I heard her say
Catch your dreams before they slip away
Dying all the time
Lose your dreams and you will lose your mind
Ain’t life unkind?

Goodbye Ruby Tuesday
Who could hang a name on you?
When you change with every new day
Still I’m gonna miss you

Goodbye Ruby Tuesday
Who could hang a name on you?
When you change with every new day
Still I’m gonna miss you

Rolling Stones – Before They Make Me Run

  • A great “Keith” song on the great Stone’s album Some Girls released in 1978. Some of the lyrics make me laugh because of how honest they are. Maybe one of the best lines in Rock “I wasn’t looking too good but I was feeling real well”… It doesn’t get much more straightforward than that.
  • Some of the others are not so fun such as “Booze and pills and powders, you can choose your medicine, Well here’s another goodbye to another good friend.” In the world where Keith was living, it rang true. I’ve read this line was about Keith’s good friend Gram Parsons who had died of a heroin overdose in 1973.

Keith recorded this song in 1978, a year after he was busted for heroin in Canada.

This and Happy are my favorite Keith Richards songs with the Stones. You Got the Silver is up there also.

Great raw Rock and Roll song.

Glyn Johns: Sound Man

I read this book not knowing what to expect but I did know of Glyn Johns… so many of my albums had his name on it…A name that is known throughout the music industry as a great recording engineer, producer, and mixer. Glyn has worked with huge rock groups such as The Rolling Stones, Beatles, Who, Small Faces, Led Zeppelin, The Band and more.

Glyn is a no-nonsense guy and unlike most of the autobiographies of musicians in that era, he never did drugs and always did his job well. Glyn wanted to be a singer and did make a few records, he covered Rolling Stones Lady Jane,  but he stuck with engineering and gradually became a producer.

Back when Glyn started in the early sixties engineers did not graduate to producing. It was very much a British class system in the music industry. He became the first freelance engineer in the industry because of the clients he attracted. He was one of the first to record the Stones and he began a relationship with them that lasted for years. He knew the Stones because he was really good friends with Ian Stewart and even shared a flat with him.

The Beatles called him to engineer Let It Be and he also helped engineer some of Abbey Road. He worked on Led Zeppelin’s first album. He produced Steve Miller’s first albums and also the first couple of Eagles albums.

This book will be very interesting to classic rock fans. Many anecdotes about the Stones, Beatles, Who and others. Glyn minces no words and has a reputation for saying what is on his mind. He isn’t too technical about recording in the book, he keeps it at a fast enjoyable pace.

He worked on some of the most classic albums ever. The Stones 60’s albums and the classic stretch of albums the Stones released until Black and Blue. He worked on Who’s Next, Quadrophenia, Led Zeppelin, A Nod Is As Good As a Wink… to a Blind Horse, Who Are You, Slowhand, just to name a few.

One interesting thing that happened in 1969. Glyn met Bob Dylan and Dylan told Johns that he would like to make an album with the Beatles and Stones. Glyn went back to England very excited and told Keith Richards and George Harrison and they were all for it. Ringo, Charlie, and Bill said they would do it. John didn’t say no but Mick and Paul said absolutely not…leaves you to wonder what it would have sounded like…

At the bottom of the page, I copied his discography from Wikipedia…it is incredible.

Excerpt from Sound Man about the Stones.

While Keith, Charlie, and Bill drove the band rhythmically, Mick’s energy and intellect drove everything else. I was constantly amazed by his skill as a songwriter and by the extraordinary energy he managed to summon for his vocal performances in the studio.
Both Mick and Keith would take an active part in the mixing process and drove me nuts making me mix a track for hours when I felt I had got it in the first couple of passes. We certainly did not always agree. I guess it would have been even more boring if we had. There were a couple of occasions when finally putting the album together I would play back earlier mixes that I had done on my own, to compare with the one they had chosen after hours of farting around, and in the cold light of day they would agree that mine were better. Equally, there were many occasions when they insisted on me changing a mix quite drastically from the way I heard it, with great effect.
Working with the Stones for all those years certainly had some amazing moments and I am proud to have been associated with them during a period of time when their music was so influential. However, Charlie summed it up perfectly when asked in a recent interview his experience of being in the band for fifty years. He replied, “Ten years of working and forty years of hanging around.”

Excerpt about The Beatles Let It Be

I had been retained originally as an engineer and was quite happy with that, even when I realized that George Martin was not producing. He did come to Twickenham a couple of times to check us out. He had arranged for the gear to be loaned for the recording at Savile Row and turned up on the day we did the filming on the roof, but had nothing to do with the production of the music. At the outset I was quite embarrassed when I realized he was not going to be involved. A couple of days into the project I asked Paul where George Martin was, only to be told that they had decided not to use him. By the time we moved to Savile Row, George, realizing I was in an awkward position, was kind enough to take me to lunch in order to put my mind at rest, saying I was doing a great job, everything was fine, and I was not stepping on his toes in any way. What a gentleman he is.
Having delivered the mixed master of my version of Let It Be, I approached each member of the band separately, asking if I could have a production credit on the album when it was released. I made it quite clear that I was only asking for that and not a royalty. Paul, George, and Ringo had no objection to my request but John was suspicious and could not understand why I was not asking for a royalty. I explained that I felt, because of their stature, the sales of the album would not be affected by my involvement one way or another, so a credit would be a fair settlement for what I had done, as by association it could only be positive for my career in the future. I never got an answer from John.
As it turned out, none of this mattered, as in the end, after the group broke up, John gave the tapes to Phil Spector, who puked all over them, turning the album into the most syrupy load of bullshit I have ever heard. My master tape, perhaps quite rightly, ended up on a shelf in the tape store at EMI. At least my version of the single of “Get Back”/“Don’t Let Me Down” had been released in April 1969.

Below is Glyn’s discography…what a body of work.

Artist Year Album Producer Engineer Mixing
Georgie Fame 1964 Rhythm and Blues at the Flamingo Yes Yes
The Rolling Stones 1965 December’s Children co-eng.Yes co-mix.Yes
The Pretty Things 1965 Get the Picture? co-prod.Yes Yes Yes
The Rolling Stones 1965 Out of Our Heads co-eng.Yes co-mix.Yes
The Rolling Stones 1966 Aftermath co-eng.Yes co-mix.Yes
The Rolling Stones 1966 Got Live if You Want It! Yes Yes
Chris Farlowe 1966 The Art of Chris Farlowe Yes Yes
The Small Faces 1966 Small Faces (Decca) Yes Yes
Chris Farlowe 1966 14 Things to Think About Yes Yes
Twice as Much 1966 Own Up Yes Yes
The Small Faces 1967 From the Beginning Yes Yes
Rolling Stones 1967 Between the Buttons Yes Yes
The Small Faces 1967 Small Faces (Immediate) Yes Yes
The Rolling Stones 1967 Flowers co-eng.Yes co-mix.Yes
The Rolling Stones 1967 Their Satanic Majesties Request Yes Yes
Johnny Hallyday 1967 San Francisco (EP) Yes Yes
The Rolling Stones 1968 Beggars Banquet Yes Yes
The Steve Miller Band 1968 Children of the Future Yes Yes Yes
Twice as Much 1968 That’s All Yes
The Pentangle 1968 The Pentangle Yes Yes
The Move 1968 Something Else from the Move Yes Yes
Spooky Tooth 1968 It’s All About Yes Yes
The Small Faces 1968 Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake Yes Yes
The Steve Miller Band 1968 Sailor Yes Yes Yes
Gerry Temple 1968 Burn Up! Yes
Procol Harum 1968 Shine on Brightly Yes Yes
The Move 1968 The Move Yes Yes
Easybeats 1968 Vigil Yes Yes
Traffic 1968 Traffic Yes Yes
Billy Nichols 1968 Would You Believe Yes Yes
The Steve Miller Band 1969 Brave New World Yes Yes Yes
Family 1969 Family Entertainment Yes Yes Yes
The End 1969 Introspection Yes Yes
The Beatles 1969 Abbey Road Yes
Joe Cocker 1969 Joe Cocker! Yes Yes
Johnny Hallyday 1969 Johnny Hallyday Yes Yes Yes
Led Zeppelin 1969 Led Zeppelin Yes
The Rolling Stones 1969 Let it Bleed Yes Yes
The Steve Miller Band 1969 Your Saving Grace Yes Yes Yes
Lambert and Nuttycombe 1970 At Home Yes Yes
Bob Dylan 1970 Self Portrait co-eng.Yes
The Rolling Stones 1970 Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! Yes Yes Yes
Humble Pie 1970 Humble Pie Yes Yes Yes
Philamore Lincoln 1970 The North Wind Blew South Yes
Billy Preston 1970 That’s the Way God Planned It Yes Yes
Leon Russell 1970 Leon Russell Yes Yes
The Beatles 1970 Let it Be Yes
Joe Cocker 1970 Mad Dogs & Englishmen Yes Yes
Delaney & Bonnie & Friends 1970 On Tour with Eric Clapton Yes
The Move 1970 Shazam Yes Yes
The Band 1970 Stage Fright co-eng.Yes
Spooky Tooth 1970 The Last Puff Yes Yes
McGuinness Flint 1970 McGuinness Flint Yes Yes Yes
The Faces 1971 A Nod Is As Good As a Wink… to a Blind Horse Yes Yes Yes
Boz Scaggs 1971 Boz Scaggs & Band Yes Yes Yes
Ben Sidran 1971 Feel Your Groove Yes Yes
McGuinness Flint 1971 Happy Birthday, Ruthie Baby Yes Yes Yes
Jesse Ed Davis 1971 ¡Jesse Davis! Yes Yes Yes
Leon Russell 1971 Leon Russell and the Shelter People Yes Yes
Boz Scaggs 1971 Moments Yes Yes Yes
Rita Coolidge 1971 Nice Feelin’ Yes
Howlin’ Wolf 1971 The London Howlin’ Wolf Sessions Yes
Humble Pie 1971 Rock On Yes Yes Yes
Graham Nash 1971 Songs for Beginners Yes
The Rolling Stones 1971 Sticky Fingers co-eng.Yes co-mix.Yes
Spooky Tooth 1971 Tobacco Road Yes Yes
The Who 1971 Who’s Next co-prod.Yes Yes Yes
Eagles 1972 Eagles Yes Yes Yes
The Rolling Stones 1972 Exile on Main St. co-eng.Yes co-mix.Yes
Rita Coolidge 1972 The Lady’s Not for Sale Yes Yes Yes
Neil Young 1972 Harvest co-eng.Yes
Nicky Hopkins, Ry Cooder, Mick Jagger, Bill Wyman, and Charlie Watts 1972 Jamming with Edward Yes Yes Yes
Chris Jagger 1973 Chris Jagger Yes
Eagles 1973 Desperado Yes Yes Yes
Eric Clapton 1973 Eric Clapton’s Rainbow Concert Yes
The Faces 1973 Ooh La La Yes Yes Yes
The Who 1973 Quadrophenia co-prod.Yes co-eng.Yes
Ric Grech 1973 The Last Five Years Yes Yes Yes
Paul McCartney and Wings 1973 Red Rose Speedway co-eng.Yes
Gallagher & Lyle 1973 Seeds Yes Yes Yes
The Ozark Mountain Daredevils 1973 The Ozark Mountain Daredevils co-prod.Yes Yes Yes
Gallagher & Lyle 1973 Willie and the Lapdog Yes Yes Yes
The Ozark Mountain Daredevils 1974 It’ll Shine When It Shines co-prod.Yes Yes Yes
The Rolling Stones 1974 It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll Yes
Eagles 1974 On the Border co-prod.Yes co-eng.Yes
Gallagher & Lyle 1974 The Last Cowboy Yes Yes Yes
Georgie Fame 1974 Georgie Fame Yes Yes Yes
Fairport Convention 1975 Rising for the Moon Yes Yes Yes
The Who 1975 The Who by Numbers Yes Yes Yes
Andy Fairweather Low 1976 Be Bop ‘n’ Holla Yes Yes Yes
Fools Gold 1976 Fools Gold Yes Yes Yes
Joan Armatrading 1976 Joan Armatrading Yes Yes Yes
Ron Wood & Ronnie Lane 1976 Mahoney’s Last Stand Yes Yes Yes
The Rolling Stones 1976 Black and Blue co-eng.Yes
Buckacre 1976 Moring Comes Yes Yes Yes
The Bernie Leadon—Michael Georgiades Band 1977 Natural Progressions Yes Yes Yes
Pete Townshend & Ronnie Lane 1977 Rough Mix Yes Yes Yes
Joan Armatrading 1977 Show Some Emotion Yes Yes Yes
Eric Clapton 1977 Slowhand Yes Yes Yes
Eric Clapton 1977 Backless Yes Yes Yes
Craig Nuttycombe 1977 It’s Just a Lifetime Yes Yes Yes
Joan Armatrading 1978 To the Limit Yes Yes Yes
Paul Kennerly and various Artists 1978 White Mansions Yes Yes Yes
The Who 1978 Who Are You co-prodYes co-eng.Yes Yes
Mark Benno 1979 Lost in Austin Yes Yes Yes
Joan Armatrading 1979 Steppin’ Out Yes Yes Yes
Live Wire (band) 1979 Pick it UP Yes
Lazy Racer 1980 Formula II Yes Yes Yes
Tim Renwick 1980 Tim Renwick Yes Yes Yes
Paul Kennerly 1980 Legend of Jessie James Yes Yes Yes
Danny Joe Brown 1981 Danny Joe Brown and the Danny Joe Brown Band Yes Yes Yes
Jools Holland 1981 Jools Holland and His Millionaires Yes Yes Yes
Midnight Oil 1981 Place Without a Postcard Yes Yes Yes
Nine Below Zero 1981 Don’t Point Your Finger Yes Yes Yes
Chris de Burgh 1981 Best Moves Yes Yes Yes
The Clash 1982 Combat Rock Yes
The Who 1982 It’s Hard Yes Yes Yes
Local Boys 1983 Moments of Madness Yes Yes Yes
Various artists 1984 ARMS Concert Yes Yes Yes
Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, Albert Lee, 1984 No Introduction Necessary Yes
Téléphone 1984 Un Autre Monde Yes Yes Yes
Bob Dylan 1984 Real Live Yes Yes Yes
Immaculate Fools 1985 Hearts of Fortune Yes
Téléphone 1986 Le Live Yes Yes Yes
Roaring Boys 1986 Roaring Boys Yes Yes Yes
The Big Dish 1986 Swimmer Yes Yes Yes
New Model Army 1986 The Ghost of Cain Yes Yes Yes
Joolz 1987 Hex Yes
Spooky Tooth 1987 Spooky Tooth Yes Yes
Helen Watson 1987 Blue Slipper Yes Yes
Labi Siffre 1987 (Something Inside) So Strong Yes Yes Yes
John Hiatt 1988 Slow Turning Yes Yes
Nancy Griffith 1989 Storms Yes Yes
Green on Red 1989 This Time Around (Green on Red album) Yes Yes
John Hiatt 1990 Stolen Moments Yes Yes
Summerhill 1990 West of Here Yes
Del Shannon 1991 The Liberty Years Yes
Energy Orchard 1992 Stop the Machine Yes Yes
Ethan Johns 1992 Independent Years Yes Yes
David Crosby 1993 Thousand Roads Yes Yes Yes
Crosby, Stills, & Nash 1994 After the Storm Yes Yes Yes
The Subdudes 1994 Annunciation Yes Yes Yes
Jackopierce 1995 Bringing on the Weather Yes
Bruce Cockburn 1994 Dart to the Heart Yes
Joe Satriani 1995 Joe Satriani Yes Yes
The Beatles 1996 Anthology 3 co-eng.Yes
Eric Clapton 1996 Crossroads 2: Live in the Seventies Yes Yes
The Rolling Stones and various artists 1996 The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus Yes Yes
Warm Jets 1997 Future Signs Yes Yes
Bill Wyman’s Rhythm Kings 1998 Struttin’ Our Stuff Yes
Linda Ronstadt 1998 We Ran Yes Yes
Bill Wyman’s Rhythm Kings 1999 Anyway the Wind Blows Yes
Emmylou Harris & Linda Ronstadt 1999 Western Wall: The Tucson Sessions Yes Yes Yes
Various artists 1999 Return of the Grievous Angel: A Tribute to Gram Parsons Yes Yes Yes
John Hiatt and various artists 20o2 Disney’s The Country Bears musical dir.
Bruce Cockburn 2005 Speechless Yes
Andy Fairweather Low 2006 Sweet Soulful Music Yes Yes Yes
The Clash 2008 Live at Shea Stadium Yes
Ian McLagan & the Bump Band 2008 Never Say Never Yes+ mastering
Ryan Adams 2011 Ashes & Fire Yes Yes Yes
Ben Waters 2011 Boogie 4 Stu: A Tribute to Ian Stewart Yes
The Rolling Stones 2012 Charlie is My Darling: Ireland 1965 Yes
The Staves 2012 Dead & Born & Grown Up & Live co-prod.Yes Yes Yes
The Rolling Stones 2012 GRRR! Yes
Band of Horses 2012 Mirage Rock Yes Yes Yes
Ethan Johns 2012 If Not Now Then When? Yes
Aaron Neville 2013 My True Story Yes
Patty Griffin 2013 Silver Bell Yes
Stephen Stills 2013 Carry On co-prod.Yes co-eng.Yes co-mixYes
Bob Dylan 2013 Another Self Portrait (1969-1971: The Bootleg Series, Vol. 10) co-eng.Yes
Benmont Tench 2014 You Should Be So Lucky Yes Yes Yes
Ian McLagan & the Bump Band 2014 United States Yes
Joe Satriani 2014 The Complete Studio Recordings Yes Yes
Bruce Cockburn 2014 Rumours of Glory (True North) Yes
David Bowie 2014 Nothing Has Changed co-eng.Yes
The Small Faces 2014 Here Come the Nice: The Immediate Years 1967-1969 Yes
The Small Faces 20.. Greatest Hits: The Immediate Years 1967-1969 Yes
The Faces 2015 You Can Make Me Dance, Sing or Anything: 1970-1975 Yes Yes
Various artists 2015 Truckers, Kickers, Cowboys Angels: The Blissed-Out Birth of Country-Rock , Vol. 7: 1974 Yes Yes Yes
Various artists 2015 Songs: The Very Best of Acoustic – The Collection co-prod.Yes
The Rolling Stones 2015 From the Vault: The Marquee Club Live in 1971 Yes
Paul McCartney 2016 Pure McCartney Yes
Eric Clapton 2016 I Still Do Yes Yes
Eagles 2017 Their Greatest Hits, Vols. 1 & 2 Yes Yes
Jesse Ed Davis 2017 Red Dirt Boogie: The Atco Recordings 1970-1972 Yes