Jimmy Buffett – Door Number Three

Love this song by Jimmy Buffett. It was released in 1974 on the A1A album. The album did include the song “A Pirate Looks at 40.” Door Number 3 is a  humorous song about being on “Let’s Make a Deal” a game show in the 1970s where contestants would dress up to get the host  Monty Halls (host) attention and try to win prizes.

Door Number Three did manage to make it to #88 in the Country Charts.

 

“Door Number Three”

Oh I took a wrong turn, it was the right turn
My turn to have me a ball
Boys at the shop told me just where to stop
If I wanted to play for it all
I didn’t know I’d find her on daytime TV
My whole world lies waiting behind door number threeI chose my apparel, wore a beer barrel
And they rolled me to the very first row
I held a big sign that said “Kiss me I’m a baker,
and Monty I sure need the dough!”
Then I grabbed that sucker by the throat
Until he called on me
Cause my whole world lies waiting behind door number three

And I don’t want what Jay’s got on his table
Or the box Carol Merrill points to on the floor
No, I’ll hold out just as long as I am able
Until I can unlock that lucky door
Well, she’s no big deal to most folks
But she’s everything to me
Cause my whole world lies waiting behind door number three

Oh Monty, Monty, Monty, I am walking down your hall
Got beat, I lost my seat but I’m not a man to crawl
No I didn’t get rich you son of a bitch
I’ll be back just wait and see
Cause my whole world lies waiting behind door number three
Yes my whole world lies waiting behind door number three

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Sugarloaf – Don’t Call Us We’ll Call You

This group is known for the song “Green Eyed Lady” that hit number 1 in 1970. Don’t Call Us is the song I remember the most. It peaked in 1975 at #9 on the Billboard 100 and #5 in Canada. The song is about frustration in the music business.

They actually play the Beatles “I Feel Fine” riff in the song and sang in the lyric that it sounded like John, Paul, and George. Included also is the rift from Stevie Wonder’s Superstition and a Wolfman Jack imitation.

CBS records had just turned them down for a recording contract and you hear a touch tone phone dialing a number…that number went to an unlisted phone number at CBS Records in Manhattan.

Below is from Songfacts

One of the labels that turned down the band was CBS Records. Sugarloaf got retribution by revealing the unlisted phone number of the label in this song by playing the sound of the touchtones when the number is dialed. Listeners with good ears could identify which tone corresponded to each number, and called it to find out where it led. After the song became a hit, CBS changed their number.

At the end of the song, there’s another set of tones; this one led to the main number at the White House. They didn’t change their number, but the band got a visit from a State Department official trying to figure out why they were getting so many calls talking about Sugarloaf.

The song has a little of everything. When I was 8 I remember this song being on the radio quite a bit…

Don’t Call Us We’ll Call You

A Long distance, directory assistance, 
Area code 212. 
Say, hey, A and R this is Mister Rhythm and Blues. 
He said, “Hello,” and put me on hold. 
To say the least the cat was cold. 
He said, don’t call us, chil’, 
We’ll call you. 

I say, “You got my number.” 
He say yeah, “I got it when 
You walked in the door.” 
Don’t call us, we’ll call you. 
Don’t call us, we’ll call you. 

I got your name from a friend of a friend, 
Who said he used to work with you. 
Do you remember the all night creatures, 
From Stereo Ninety-Two? 
“Yeah,” I said, “Could you relate 
To our quarter track tape? 
You know the band performs in the nude?” 
He said, “nUh-uh, don’t call us, chil’, 
We’ll call you. 

Listen, kid, you paid for the call, 
You ain’t bad but we’ve heard it all before, 
And it sounds like, uh, John, Paul and George. 

Anyway, we cut a hit and we toured a bit, 
With a song he said he couldn’t use. 
And now he calls and begs and crawls, 
It’s telephone deja vu. 
We got percentage points and lousy joints, 
And all the glitter we can use, 
Mama, so, uhh don’t call us, 
Now we’ll call you. 

Listen kid you paid for the call, 
You ain’t bad but I heard it all before. 
Don’t call us, we’ll call you. 
Don’t call us. 
Don’t call us, we’ll call you. 
[Fade.] 
Don’t call us, we’ll call you. 
Don’t call us, we’ll call you. 

Saturday Night: A Backstage History of Saturday Night Live

If you want to know why and how Saturday Night Live came to be…this is the book. It covers the first 10 years of the show but is primarily about the first 5 years and the one terrible year after the classic cast left. It was written by Doug Hill and Jeff Weingrad and they interviewed practically everyone connected with the show and it is surprising on how objective they are throughout the book.

Working on the show was/is not for the thin-skinned. It was rough and no one was spared…not even the stars at first. The book goes into detail about how the show started a pattern of work that continued through the decades. The troubles the female writers went through trying to do their job. The endless drugs that fueled many of the all-night writing sessions.

The atmosphere could be very sexist, insulting and aggressive. Michael O’Donoghue was the key writer and gave SNL the edge but he could be difficult. When he left the show he was missed. When the original cast, writers, and Lorne Michaels left, Jean Doumanian took over the show for a year. Things didn’t go well, to say the least. The book details the transition then to Dick Ebersol.

The show went from an ensemble show trying new ideas to a star-driven formulaic show under Ebersol. Maybe the show was destined to do that anyway and it would never be the same again.

I’ve read a few books on SNL but as far as the creation and original cast…this is the one to go to.

 

 

 

Hot Chocolate – Everyone 1’s a Winner

Everyone 1’s a winner came off an album of the same name by Hot Chocolate. It peaked at #6 in 1979. It’s known for the great guitar riff that was played through a Roland synthesizer.

They are best known for “You Sexy Thing” but this is one that sticks with me. Hot Chocolate was briefly signed with The Beatle’s Apple Records and they did a reggae version of John Lennon’s “Give Peace a Chance.”

This band charted a song every year between 1970 and 1984.

“Every 1’s A Winner”

Never could believe the things you do to me
Never could believe the way you are
Every day I bless the day that you got through to me
‘Cause baby, I believe that you’re a starEveryone’s a winner, baby, that’s the truth (yes, the truth)
Making love to you is such a thrill
Everyone’s a winner, baby, that’s no lie (yes, no lie)
You never fail to satisfy (satisfy)
Let’s do it again[Instrumental]Never could explain just what was happening to me
Just one touch of you and I’m a flame
Baby, it’s amazing just how wonderful it is
That the things we like to do are just the sameEveryone’s a winner, baby, that’s the truth (yes, the truth)
Making love to you is such a thrill
Everyone’s a winner, baby, that’s no lie (yes, no lie)
You never fail to satisfy (satisfy)[Instrumental]Let’s do it againEveryone’s a winner, baby, that’s the truth (yes, the truth)
Making love to you is such a thrill
Everyone’s a winner, baby, that’s no lie (yes, no lie)
You never fail to satisfy (satisfy)Oh, baby
Oh, baby
Oh, baby…

Sammy Johns – Chevy Van

Sammy Johns released Chevy Van back in 1975 and it peaked at #5 in the Billboard Top 100 and reached #7 in Canada. It is pure AM 70’s pop but it does take me back to that time.

The musicians that back Johns are the famous Wrecking Crew from Los Angeles. The song has been covered by many Country artists and most recently by Eric Church.

Vans were very popular in the 70s…Not family Mini Vans but rolling waterbed and shag carpet teenage machines. They were customized to have everything in them… Some movies were even centered around vans (Vansploitation)

 

Chevy Van

I gave a girl a ride in my wagon
She rolled in and took control
She was tired and her mind was a-draggin’
I said get some sleep and dream of rock and roll

‘Cause like a picture she was layin’ there
Moonlight dancin’ off her hair
She woke up and took me by the hand
She’s gonna love me in my Chevy van
And that’s all right with me

Her young face was like that of an angel
Her long legs were tanned and brown
Better keep your eyes on the road, son
Better slow this vehicle down

‘Cause like a picture she was layin’ there
Moonlight dancin’ off her hair
She woke up and took me by the hand
She’s gonna love me in my Chevy van
And that’s all right with me

I put her out in a town that was so small
You could throw a rock from end to end
A dirt road Main Street, she walked off in bare feet
It’s a shame I won’t be passin’ through again

‘Cause like a picture she was layin’ there
Moonlight dancin’ off her hair
She woke up and took me by the hand
We made love in my Chevy van
And that’s all right with me

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Bruce Springsteen – Johnny Bye Bye

This is Bruce’s song about Elvis Presley. Bruce was a big fan of Elvis but this looks at the dark side. After the glory had left and the lifestyle that caught up with Elvis with tragic results.

The song was released as a B side to “I’m On Fire” in 1985.

It is a haunting song to listen to. The key words are the last lines of the song…”You didn’t have to die, You didn’t have to die.” The song is credited to Chuck Berry and Bruce because Bruce rewrote the Berry song Bye Bye Johnny to fit his story.

It has always reminded me of another great Springsteen song… Cadillac Ranch.

Bruce Springsteen quote

 “The type of fame Elvis had . . . the pressure of it, the isolation that it seems to require, has gotta be really painful”

“Johnny Bye-Bye”

Well she drew out all her money from the Southern Trust
And put her little boy on the Greyhound Bus
Leaving Memphis with a guitar in his hand
With a one-way ticket to the promised land
Hey little girl with the red dress on
There’s a party tonight down in Memphis town
I’ll be going down there if you need a ride
The man on the radio says Elvis Presley’s died We drove to Memphis, the sky was hard and black
Up over the ridge came a white Cadillac
They’d drawn out all his money and they laid him in the back
A woman cried from the roadside “Ah he’s gone, he’s gone”
They found him slumped up against the drain
With a whole lot of trouble running through his veins
Bye-bye Johnny
Johnny bye-bye
You didn’t have to die
You didn’t have to die

Kim Mitchell – Go For a Soda

I have fond memories of this song in the 80s. Candian Kim Mitchell released this it in 1984 off his Akimbo Alogo album. The song peaked at #86 on the US Billboard 100 but #22 in Canada. I remember it getting plenty of airplay in my region. It did hit #12 on the Billboard Top Rock Tracks.

MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) used this song as a theme song. The reason the song caught on with me is the bass guitar sound. I was playing bass at the time and loved the huge sound of it when it kicks in.

Kim Mitchell had a very good career in Canada with 7 top twenty singles…Welcome to early eighties videos!

 

Go For A Soda

Might as well go for a soda…Nobody hurts and nobody cries
Might as well go for a soda…Nobody drowns and nobody dies

So we’re in one of our blue moods
You wanna have it your way and I want it mine
All this debating going ’round in our blue mood
Makes me thirst for love

Chorus:
Might as well go for a soda…Nobody hurts and nobody cries
Might as well go for a soda…Nobody drowns and nobody dies

Life seems to be a bomb inside your head
Well the bomb in my head is love
All this debating going ’round in our blue mood
Makes me thirsty for love

Chorus:
Might as well go for a soda…Nobody hurts and nobody cries
Might as well go for a soda…Nobody drowns and nobody dies
Might as well go for a soda…It’s better than slander
It’s better than lies
Might as well go for a soda…Nobody hurts and nobody cries