Beatles – Day Tripper

One of the greatest rock guitar riffs…this was credited to Lennon – McCartney and they both worked on it.

This was released as a double-A-sided single with “We Can Work It Out.” It peaked at #1 in the UK and #5 in the Billboard 100.

“We Can Work It Out” got more airplay in the US. In America, the single was released on the same day as the Rubber Soul album, although neither song was on that album. The Beatles were popular enough to support the output…they thought of releasing singles and albums as two different things. What other bands would not place both of these songs on their new album?

A great rock song that still sounds good today.

Paul McCartney: “That was a co-written effort; we were both there making it all up but I would give John the main credit. Probably the idea came from John because he sang the lead, but it was a close thing. We both put a lot of work in on it.”

John Lennon: “Day Trippers are people who go on a day trip, right? Usually on a ferryboat or something. But the song was kind of – you’re just a weekend hippie. Get it?”

 

From Songfacts

John Lennon’s lyrics were his first overt reference to LSD in a Beatles song. The song can be seen as Lennon teasing Paul McCartney about not taking acid.

In 2004, Paul McCartney did an interview with the Daily Mirror newspaper where he explained that drugs influenced many of The Beatles’ songs. He singled this one out as being about acid (LSD), but also said that people often overestimate the influence of drugs on their music.

The Beatles had some fun with the line, “She’s a big teaser,” which they jokingly worked up as “she’s a prick teaser.” In context with the next line, “She took me half the way there,” it’s pretty clear what’s going on. The group managed to slip in subtle sexual innuendo in a few of their songs, including “I’m Down” and “Please Please Me.”

A short promotional film of The Beatles lip-synching to this song was made for the TV special The Music Of Lennon and McCartney, which first aired December 17, 1965 in the UK. It was one of the first music videos. 

Jimi Hendrix sometimes covered this at his concerts.

James Taylor did a cover version on his album Flag

With a packed schedule and feverish demand for TV appearances, The Beatles made music videos for five on their songs, including this one, at a one-day shoot at Twickenham Film Studios in London on November 23, 1965. They did three different versions of “Day Tripper,” lip-synching the song while having fun with the set pieces.

Day Tripper

Got a good reason
For taking the easy way out
Got a good reason
For taking the easy way out now
She was a day tripper
One way ticket, yeah
It took me so long to find out
And I found out

She’s a big teaser
She took me half the way there
She’s a big teaser
She took me half the way there, now
She was a day tripper
One way ticket, yeah
It took me so long to find out
And I found out
Ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah

Tried to please her
She only played one night stand
Tried to please her
She only played one night stand, now
She was a day tripper
Sunday driver, yeah
It took me so long to find out
And I found out

Day tripper, day tripper, yeah
Day tripper, day tripper, yeah
Day tripper, day tripper, yeah

Author: badfinger20 (Max)

Power Pop fan, Baseball fan, old movie and tv show fan... and a songwriter, bass and guitar player.

20 thoughts on “Beatles – Day Tripper”

  1. Great choice Max.
    April Wine nicked the opening riff of Day Tripper and Satisfaction(Stones) and put it at the end of ‘I Like To Rock’. AW never even got sued as a result!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It would have been frustrating I think back then not to have so many great Beatles songs on albums. Of course today they are and we don’t give it too much thought. Imagine putting all the singles that The Beatles released as singles only on albums. Of course on vinyl there is only so much room. I would have hated to have missed out on anything they did….save maybe a few songs like “Maxwell’s Silver Hammer.” “Day Tripper” over “We Can Work It Out” but both were gems.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The Beatles did a lot of songs that were never released as album tracks on Parlophone. Capitol did a good thing by reconfiguring the albums to include the singles, but it made it difficult when the Parlophone albums became available here on CD and many of the songs you expected to hear weren’t there. I finally created iTunes playlists that reflected the Capitol lineups. It made life easier…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rubber Soul and Revolver is quite different from the originals.

      I am glad they let Sgt Pepper and the rest go through…well MMT the American album became the standard but everything after that wasn’t touched…with original albums.

      Most bands wanted that hit single on the album…they treated it like two different functions.

      Liked by 1 person

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