Fanny – All Mine

This song has a pop sound that is really catchy. Al Mine would have fit the top 40 at the time perfectly. The more I’ve listened to this band the more I’ve become a fan. This song was the B side to the single with Summer Song as the A side.

Fanny played hard rock, soul, some Motown-ish music (like this one), and just rock and roll. I did get a comment from someone who saw them live in the 1970s. The comment was LOUD and very good as they opened for bands such Procol Harum, Humble Pie, Deep Purple, and David Bowie.

When you are an all female band opening up for these bands…you are not a novelty…you are the real deal. They were more successful in the UK and Europe, where audiences appreciated their music and respected their work.

Did the public ignore them because they were all female? If so, the public missed out.

They fit in with different genres and they deserved more attention. This song was written by the sisters June and Jean Millington. It was on their Mother’s Pride album.

Fanny released a studio album in 2018 called Fanny Walked the Earth. Their last  album before that one was Rock and Roll Survivors released in 1974.

Fanny – Mothers Pride (1973, Vinyl) - Discogs

June Millington:  “We knew we had to prove we could play and deliver live. Otherwise, no one would believe it.” 

All Mine

Oh, when you’re looking for someone to love
It isn’t easy to live without love
And when you’re lonely, it’s harder to laugh
You made it easy, that’s all in the past

Oh baby, I love when you give to me; you’re all mine, all mine

It’s hard live when you’re by yourself
We need to give to somebody else
You need a lover to rock you to sleep
And lend a shoulder when you’re dead on your feet

Oh baby, I love when you give to me; you’re all mine, all mine
Oh baby, I love when you give to me; you’re all mine, all mine

It’s hard live when you’re by yourself (by yourself)
We need to give to somebody else (somebody else)
You need a lover to rock you to sleep (rock you to sleep)
And lend a shoulder when you’re dead on your feet

Oh baby, I love when you give to me; you’re all mine, all mine
All mine (mine, all mine)
I’m in love with you, say you love me, too etc

Fanny – Last Night I Had A Dream

The vocals on this song won me over when I heard it. Keyboard player Nickey Barclay nails the vocals on this song. She goes from 0 to 100 and she turns into a Janis Joplin. It builds up slowly and then Barclay wails the vocal while June Millington breaks out on the slide guitar at the end to a huge crescendo. The drummer Alice de Buhr does a really cool rhythm pattern for this song…

There have been a few all female rock bands (not enough) but this one…to me is the most talented one I’ve heard. They were not a “girl group”…they were a full fledged rock band. They didn’t have the pop song to take them over the top but for what they did…they didn’t need it.

The live version I have on the Midnight Special is much better than the studio cut. This song was written by Randy Newman and it has such wonderful lines in it.

I saw a vampire, I saw a ghost
Everybody scared me, but you scared me the most
In the dream I had last night

From all the clips I’ve seen of Fanny live…their live sound just wasn’t caught in the studio and they were much better live. BTW…love the eye-shadow or glam-shadow (thanks Vic)…what ever it is…another reason to love the seventies.

Last Night I Had A Dream

Last night I had a dream
You were in it, and I was in it with you
And everyone that I know
And everyone that you know was in my dream
I saw a vampire, I saw a ghost
Everybody scared me, but you scared me the most
In the dream I had last night
In the dream I had last night

In my dream

Last night I had a dream
Scared me before you know I woke up screaming
Saw all of my in-laws and whole lot of outlaws
In my dream
I saw the wolfman Jack and saw the mummy too

In the dream I had last night
In the dream I had last night
In that dream

It started out in a barnyard at sundown
And everyone was laughing
And you were lying on the ground

You said, “honey, can you tell me what your name is?”
“Honey, can you tell me what your name is?”
I said, “damn damn what your game is”

You know what my game is

In the dream I had last night
In the dream I had last night

I saw a vampire, I saw a ghost
Everybody scared me, but you scared me the most
In the dream I had last night
In the dream I had last night

In the dream I had last night, in my dream
In the dream I had last night, in my dream

Last night I had a dream
You were in it, and I was in it with you
And everyone that I know
And everyone that you know was in my dream
I saw a vampire, I saw a ghost
Everybody scared me, but you scared me the most
In the dream I had last night
In the dream I had last night, in my dream

….

Birtha – Too Much Woman (For a Henpecked Man)

Birtha was an all female rock/soul band from the seventies…and they didn’t mess about. They were really aggressive in their sound.  Birtha was formed in 1968 by singer-bassist Rosemary Butler and guitarist-singer Shele Pinizzotto. The band consisted of Shele Pinizzotto, Rosemary Butler, Sherry Hagler, and drummer Olivia “Liver” Favela. All of them sang and provided backup vocals.

In the early seventies there were not loads of all female rock bands around. Fanny was probably the most successful one during that time. The other band I found was Isis… they were more of a horn rock band. Birtha was straight ahead rock and roll with some soul leanings.

The group immediately started playing the club circuit and toured from California to Alaska. From 1968 to 1971 Birtha worked to tighten and refine their rock sound and in 1971 they started writing their own material. Birtha signed a record contract with Dunhill Records in 1972 and recorded their first album, Birtha with record producer Gabriel Mckler and Engineers, David Hassinger and Val Caray.

Birtha released their self-titled debut album in 1972. It features nine songs, six of them written by the band.  Too Much Woman (For a Henpecked Man) was written by Ike Turner. It was on Ike and Tina’s album Come Together released in 1970.

Birtha worked hard and toured constantly. They opened up for such acts as Fleetwood Mac, Alice Cooper, Poco, Black Oak Arkansas, Cheech and Chong, B.B. King, Three Dog Night, and The James Gang.

Birtha disbanded in 1975. The only member to continue in music was Rosemary Butler, who did backing vocals for James Taylor, The Doobie Brothers, Nicolette Larson, Neil Diamond, the Charlie Daniels Band, and numerous other artists. She also released a solo album in 1983.

I’m including two songs to give more of a selection of their music. As with Fanny…this band should have been heard…they were super talented. 

Too Much Woman (For a Henpecked Man)

I wanna be loved, not teased
I don’t want no man on his knees
A henpecked man I can’t respect
‘Cause I’m a hard woman to handle, and I know that

He’s gotta be staid
Use his head to turn me on
Not give it all

My Mama was mean, my Papa was cruel
I never got the chance to do like the other girls
But now I’m a woman, sweet twenty-one
I wanna find myself a man and have myself some fun

He’s gotta be staid
Use his head to turn me on
Not give it all
Get it on, y’all

Pullin’ cotton sacks is all I’ve ever known
The man I find has got to be strong
‘Cause a weak man I can’t stand
Because I’m too much of a woman to have a henpecked man

He’s gotta be staid
Use his head to turn me on
Not give it all
So get it on

Fanny – Special Care

I posted a different song from this band a while ago.  I’ve been listening to them recently and they were a special (see David Bowie quote below) band. The musicianship of Fanny was outstanding.

Their name was Wild Honey but…according to Wiki… The band was then renamed Fanny, not with a sexual connotation but to denote a female spirit

These women rocked…not pop rock but blues rock. They were pioneers before the Runaways, Bangles and the Go Go’s…and those bands all cited Fanny as an influence. Fanny was different than those bands… They had a blues edge about them.

Fanny was formed in the late sixties in Sacramento by two Filipina sisters, Jean and June Millington. June Millington was the lead guitar player and her sister Jean was the bass player. June could play circles around many rock guitarists.  Fanny would be the first all-female band to release an album on a major label (their self-titled debut, on Reprise, 1970) and land four singles in the Billboard Hot 100 and two in the top 40. The band played blues, rock, and some pop.

Fanny toured worldwide, opening for Slade, Jethro Tull, Deep Purple, and Humble Pie. They were praised by David Bowie, John Lennon, George Harrison, Lowell George, Sly Stone, and Bonnie Raitt but yet vanished without much fan fair. They were touring and releasing records between 1970 – 1975.

This song was on their Charity Ball album. The album peaked at #140 in the Billboard Album Charts. The title song charted at #40.

The worked with producers such as Vini Poncia, Geoff Emerick, and Richard Perry. They also worked with

June was described by Guitar Player as the hottest female guitar player in the music industry in the 70s. She made a career as a producer for artists including Holly Near, Cris Williamson and Bitch and Animal. June also operates a music camp for young girls. Jean has done studio work for many artists, including Keith Moon, David Bowie, and Roderick Taylor. Jean also married Bowie’s guitarist Earl Slick and is presently an herbalist. The Millingtons continued to record together after Fanny as well, most recently on the 2011 album Play Like a Girl on June’s label Fabulous Records.

They also worked with Barbra Streisand. Jean commented that they heard horror stories about her from other musicians but she treated the band with nothing but respect.

These ladies need to be heard and remembered.

David Bowie:

“They were one of the finest fucking rock bands of their time,” “They were extraordinary: They wrote everything, they played like motherfuckers, they were just colossal and wonderful, and nobody’s ever mentioned them. They’re as important as anybody else who’s ever been, ever; it just wasn’t their time.”

This is a trailer for documentary about Fanny…it’s short and interesting. 

Special Care

You there in the corner
Staring at me
Do you think I’m blowing my cool
Playing the fool?

You there in the window
Staring at me
Do you think I’m trouble?
Would you like to shoot me down?
(Shoot me down, down, down, down)

Now, now, now, special care
(Special care)
Has been taken
To make you aware
(Special Care)
You’re forsaken
If you don’t care
(Special Care)

They’re gonna come burn your house down
(Burn it down, down, down, down)

Woaaaaa. Wooooaaaaaa
(Guitar Magic)
Ooaaaa
(Special Care)
Oo-hoo-hoo
(has been taken to make you aware)
Oo-hooooo
(You’re forsaken. If you don’t care)

Ohh-huh, they’re gonna come and burn it down
Down, oh, yeah, oh yeah, oh, do it, do it, do it

(Special Care)
(Special Care)
(Special Care)
(Special Care)
(Special Care) 

Fanny – Ain’t That Peculiar

I’m always on the lookout for new old music…I’ve heard this band mentioned by rock stars before like David Bowie…I see why a lot of musicians liked them. They opened up for some huge bands. They were one of the pioneer all-female rock bands.

Fanny was formed in the late sixties in Sacramento by two Filipina sisters, Jean and June Millington. Fanny would be the first all-female band to release an album on a major label (their self-titled debut, on Reprise, 1970) and land four singles in the Billboard Hot 100 and two in the top 40. The band played blues, rock, and some pop.

They never got that one big hit single to break them to the masses. The broke up in 1975 and reunited in 2018 and released an album titled Fanny Walked the Earth.

They really impressed David Bowie…he said in 1999:

“They were one of the finest fucking rock bands of their time,” “They were extraordinary: They wrote everything, they played like motherfuckers, they were just colossal and wonderful, and nobody’s ever mentioned them. They’re as important as anybody else who’s ever been, ever; it just wasn’t their time.”

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/fanny-lives-inside-the-return-of-the-pioneering-all-female-rock-band-125635/

Lowell George of Little Feat was another fan of the band and jammed with the group when they were in Los Angeles

Ain’t That Peculiar was a song written by Pete Moore, William Smokey Robinson, Bobby Rogers, and Marv Tarplin. Marvin Gaye covered it in 1965.

Fanny’s version peaked at #85 in the Billboard 100 in 1972.

 

Ain’t That Peculiar

You do me wrong but still
I’m crazy about you
Stay away too long
And I can’t do without you

Every chance you get
You seem to hurt me
More and more
But each hurt makes my love
Much stronger than before

I know that flowers
Grow with the rain
But how can love
Grow with the pain

Ain’t that peculiar
Ain’t that peculiar

You tell me lies that
Should be obvious to me
But I’m so much
In love with you, baby
That I don’t want to see

That the things you do and say
Are designed to make me blue
Now, it’s a doggone shame
My love for you makes
All your lies seem true

Now, if the truth
Makes love last longer
Why do lies make
My love stronger

Ain’t that peculiar
Ain’t that peculiar

You do me wrong but still
I’m crazy about you
Stay away too long
And I can’t do without you

Every chance you get
You seem to hurt me
More and more
But each hurt makes my love
Much stronger than before

I know that flowers
Grow with the rain
But how can love
Grow with the pain

Ain’t that peculiar
Ain’t that peculiar
Ain’t that peculiar
Ain’t that peculiar
Ain’t that peculiar
Ain’t that peculiar