Rolling Stones – 100 Years Ago

100 Years Ago is a Rolling Stones song off of their 1973 album Goats Head Soup. It’s a song where Jagger is nostalgic which doesn’t happen often…  Some of the lyrics…

Now all my friends are wearing worried smiles
Living out a dream of what they was
Don’t you think it’s sometimes wise not to grow up?

The song has a good melody but it changes it’s focus in the last three-quarters of the way through…a good song with an interesting outro. It’s an album cut and you never hear it much on the radio. It’s a good song and worth a listen. If you see them in concert and want to hear this song…don’t hold your breath.

According to Wiki

“100 Years Ago” was only played on the first two performances of European Tour of 1973, and has not been performed live since.

“100 Years Ago”

Went out walkin’ through the wood the other day
And the world was a carpet laid before me
The buds were bursting and the air smelled sweet and strange
And it seemed about a hundred years ago
Mary and I, we would sit upon a gate
Just gazin’ at some dragon in the sky
What tender days, we had no secrets hid away
Well, it seemed about a hundred years ago
Now all my friends are wearing worried smiles
Living out a dream of what they was
Don’t you think it’s sometimes wise not to grow up?
Wend out walkin’ through the wood the other day
Can’t you see the furrows in my forehead?
What tender days, we had no secrets hid away
Now it seems about a hundred years ago
Now if you see me drinkin’ bad red wine
Don’t worry ’bout this man that you love
Don’t you think it’s sometimes wise not to grow up?
You’re gonna kiss and say good-bye, yeah, I warn you
You’re gonna kiss and say good-bye, yeah, I warn you
You’re gonna kiss and say good-bye, oh Lord, I warn you
And please excuse me while I hide away
Call me lazy bones
Ain’t got no time to waste away
Lazy bones ain’t got no time to waste away
Don’t you think it’s just about time to hide away? Yeah, yeah!

George Harrison – Isn’t It a Pity

This 1970 George Harrison song is off of the great album “All Things Must Pass.” It is often overlooked but its one of my favorite George Harrison songs. George wrote it in 1966 but it didn’t see daylight until 1970. He brought it up on the Let It Be sessions but he later said that John Lennon rejected it. That I don’t understand…I Me Mine was passed but not this one? I like “I Me Mine” but not like this one. Maybe George did more work on it afterward or it was the length of the song.

It resembles Hey Jude in its structure. It was the B side to My Sweet Lord which went to #1 on the charts. In Canada, this song was the preferred song and it went to #1 in Canada.

No one benefitted from the break up of the Beatles like George. He had so many songs that we had written and could not get enough of them on Beatles albums, understandably so with Lennon and McCartney. He released a 3 album set called “All Things Must Pass” in 1970.

George began recording this Isn’t It A Pity on June 2, 1970. Phil Spector produced it using his trademark Wall of Sound with heavy reverb. On the remastered version, the reverb is toned down a little.

This is from Timothy White’s interview with George Harrison that appeared in the Dec. 30, 2000, issue of Billboard:

Had you intended songs like “Isn’t It A Pity” to be things just for you?

No, I mean, this is the funny thing: imagine if the Beatles had gone on and on. Well, the songs on “All Things Must Pass,” maybe some of them I would probably only just got ’round to do now, you know, with my quota that I was allowed [laughs]. “Isn’t It A Pity” would just have been a Beatles song, wouldn’t it? And now that could be said for each one of us. “Imagine” would have been a Beatles song, but it was with John’s songs. It just happened that the Beatles finished. 

What was the inspiration for “Isn’t It A Pity”?

It’s just an observation of how society and myself were or are. We take each other for granted — and forget to give back. That was really all it was about.

It’s like “love lost and love gained between 16- and 20-year-olds.” But I must explain: Once, at the time I was at Warner Bros. and I wrote that song “Blood From A Clone” [on the 1981 “Somewhere In England” album], that was when they were having all these surveys out on the street to find out what was a hit record. And apparently, as I was told, a hit record is something that is about “love gained or lost between 14- and 19-year-olds,” or something really dumb like that.

So that’s why I wrote “Isn’t Is A Pity” [laughs]; I thought, ‘Oh, I’ll get in on that!”

 

“Isn’t It A Pity”

Isn’t it a pity
Now, isn’t it a shame
How we break each other’s hearts
And cause each other pain
How we take each other’s love
Without thinking anymore
Forgetting to give back
Isn’t it a pitySome things take so long
But how do I explain
When not too many people
Can see we’re all the same
And because of all their tears
Their eyes can’t hope to see
The beauty that surrounds them
Isn’t it a pity

Isn’t it a pity
Isn’t is a shame
How we break each other’s hearts
And cause each other pain
How we take each other’s love
Without thinking anymore
Forgetting to give back
Isn’t it a pity

Forgetting to give back
Isn’t it a pity
Forgetting to give back
Now, isn’t it a pity

[6 times, fade the 6th:]
What a pity
What a pity, pity, pity
What a pity
What a pity, pity, pity

John Hiatt – Window on the World

I heard this song and liked it right away. Jimmy Buffett did a cover but I prefer John’s rawer version. It came out in 2003 on the album “Beneath This Gruff Exterior” which peaked at #73 on the Billboard Charts.  I don’t see any chart history on this song. John’s reputation has always been better than his chart success but other artists have covered his songs with great chart success…Bonnie Raitt being one.

John mentions “Wes and Jimmy” and that would be Jazz musicians Wes Montgomery and Jimmy Smith.

Personally, I like John’s voice and I usually like his version of his songs.

 

“Window On The World”

A broken promise i kept too long
A greasy shade and a curtain drawn
A broken glass and a heart gone wrong
That’s my window on the worldA cup of coffee in a shaky hand
Wakin’ up in a foreign land
Tryin’ to act like i got somethin’ planned
That’s my window on the world

[Chorus 1:]
That’s my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
Don’t let mama cut those curfs
That’s my window on the world

In broad daylight that circus tent pulled up stakes
I don’t know where it went
A close dark room with a busted vent
That’s my window on the world

I think about you when i’m countin’ sheep
I think about you, then i can’t sleep
I think that ocean is just so deep
That’s my window on the world

[Chorus 2:]
That’s my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
The queen of Sheba meets the duke of earle
That’s my window on the world

Down on indiana avenue
Wes and jimmy, man they played the blues
I guess they were only passin’ through
That’s my window on the world

[Chorus 1:]
That’s my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
Don’t let mama cut those curfs
That’s my window on the world

[Chorus 2:]
That’s my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
The queen of Sheba meets the duke of earle
That’s my window on the world

 

The General

This is Buster Keaton’s civil war era masterpiece. It was released in 1927 to mediocre reviews. Keaton was ahead of his time and it caught the audience by surprise. This movie is now considered one of the best movies ever made. Buster wanted to make it look real to the era. He told his crew to make it so authentic that it hurt.

This film contained the most expensive shot in silent movie history. Buster had free rein on this movie and it showed. His budget was $750,000 dollars which was huge at the time. Buster had a bridge built just to have a train go across it and crash. The single scene cost 42,000 in 1927 dollars. In today’s money that would be over half a million. But doesn’t it look great?

general train.jpg

Buster made the movie in Cottage Grove Oregon. Animal House would be made there 51 years later. When World War 2 came the train was pulled out and used for scrap iron. People say you can still find fragments around this site of the train.

This movie was based on a true story in the civil war known now as The Great Locomotive Chase or Andrew’s Raid. From Wiki

It was a military raid that occurred April 12, 1862, in northern Georgia during the American Civil War. Volunteers from the Union Army, led by civilian scout James J. Andrews, commandeered a train, The General, and took it northward toward Chattanooga, Tennessee, doing as much damage as possible to the vital Western and Atlantic Railroad (W&A) line from Atlanta to Chattanooga as they went. They were pursued by Confederate forces at first on foot, and later on a succession of locomotives, including The Texas, for 87 miles (140 km).

Because the Union men had cut the telegraph wires, the Confederates could not send warnings ahead to forces along the railway. Confederates eventually captured the raiders and quickly executed some as spies, including Andrews; some others were able to flee. Some of the raiders were the first to be awarded the Medal of Honor by the US Congress for their actions. As a civilian, Andrews was not eligible.

Buster made a few changes in the story because he said at the time that you could not make a hero out of the Union Army. The cannon he used in the film was built to the specs of the Civil War Era. When he shot the cannonball from the cannon cart on the train to land in the locomotive… he kept trying different measures of powder to get it right until he had to use tweezers to get the right amount. He would do gags without camera trickery when he could. Below is the cannon shot… shot without cuts.

general2.jpg

Buster went to great pains for everything to be right. Some said at one time it was the closest thing you could get to see the Civil War. He worked for an independent producer Joseph Schenck so he had complete control of his movies. A little while after this movie lost money he had to go into the studio system and still managed to make a couple of great movies for MGM but after that, the studio would control everything he did which meant the quality of his movies took a nose dive.

Buster was an incredible filmmaker. This movie is a true chase movie. Buster is either chasing the General (train) after it was stolen or being chased by the Union Army in the “Texas” until it crashes in the ravine.

This movie is worth renting or tracking down. This is one I hope I will be able to see on the big screen one day.

It ranks #155 on the best movies ever on IMDB.

The Mary Tyler Moore Show

Sitcoms come and go but some will be remembered long after they are gone…this is one of them. This series featured a single woman Mary Richards (Mary Tyler Moore) working and dating. She had career ambitions far beyond getting married and having children. Doesn’t seem like a big deal now but at the time this wasn’t done. Everyone knew Mary from The Dick Van Dyke Show which finished a few years before.

The Mary Richards character was going to be divorced in the show but the producers thought the audience would think she divorced Dick Van Dyke…so that wasn’t happening. This show featured women and men writers and a great cast. As the show progressed it wasn’t all about Mary, the talented cast all got their turns.

Mary moves into a studio apartment in Minneapolis Minnesota with a neurotic landlady Phyllis Lindstrom (Cloris Leachman) and a tough New York Jewish neighbor Rhoda Morgenstern (Valerie Harper).

She gets a job at WJM-TV a low rated television station in Minneapolis. Her boss was Lou Grant (Ed Asner) and her co-worker’s name was Murray Slaughter (Gavin MacLeod). The weatherman was Gordy Howard (John Amos) and the newscaster was the incompetent Ted Baxter (Ted Knight).

The show was written to entertain adults more than a family. The writing was smart and nothing ever seemed forced. This is a great sitcom that many modern shows look to.

The show featured one of the best-known episodes from any sitcom…“Chuckles Bites the Dust”

Let’s go through the characters.

mary.jpg

Mary Richards – Mary is a career minded, honest and good to a fault person. She was the cheerleader in high school you had a crush on.

rhoda

Rhoda Morgenstern – A self-deprecating neighbor who envied Mary Richards but ended up her best friend. Her and Mary’s relationship was an important part early on in the show.

lou grant.jpg

Lou Grant – The hard-drinking, gruff, tough but lovable boss who was the father figure to Mary. Lou would treat everyone fair through the office and would stop himself from strangling Ted.

phyllis.jpg

Phyllis Lindstrom – Phyllis and her husband Lars (who is never seen) manage the building which Mary lives in. She is snobbish, neurotic, and has an adversarial relationship with Rhoda but you still end up liking her.

murray-slaughter.jpg

Murray Slaughter – The writer of the show and he is eternally mad at Ted Knight for mispronouncing everything he has written. He is a middle-aged man married with kids but has a secret crush on Mary…like everyone in the office.

ted.jpg

Ted Baxter – Ted Knight was made for this character. Ted has a giant ego, is incompetent but makes more money than anyone at the station…yea like real life. Ted supplies a lot of the humor for the show.

sueann.png

Sue Ann Nivens (Betty White) – She is catty, man-hungry and can be downright mean. She is always ready with a backhanded compliment to Mary. She created more audience sympathy for Phyllis when she had an affair with Phyllis’s husband Lars. Once in a while, the writers will show her vulnerable side.

gordy.jpg

Gordy Howard – A very professional weatherman who gets promoted much to Ted’s dismay…John Amos left to star on Good Times.

george.jpg

Georgette Baxter  (Georgia Engel) – Georgette may have been the most innocent character ever on a sitcom. She dated Ted for a while and then Ted finally married her. She may have been sweet and innocent but she could handle Ted.

Mary Tyler Moore Cast

mtm cast

 

 

Steve Miller – Heart Like a Wheel

Many Steve Miller songs I have heard too many times. This one hasn’t been completely worn out. Heart Like a Wheel came out in 1981 on the Circle of Love album. A great thin guitar sound on this song.

Steve started his career more blues-oriented but with “The Joker” in 1973 started in a more pop/rock direction.

This song peaked at #24 on the Billboard Charts in 1981. Steve’s lyrics won’t ever be confused with Bob Dylan’s but the man can write a catchy pop/rock hook.

 

“Heart Like A Wheel”

I’ve got a heart like a wheel
Feel like I got to roll
Ooohh

Heart like a wheel
I told you so
And I’ve been loving you for so long
You are the one
Heart so real
I love you so

Well, I can give what I take
And you know I want to give you my love
Babe I ain’t faking
You know I want to give you my love

I’ve been loving you for so long
You are the one
Heart so real
I love you so
Come on and roll

I’ve been loving you for so long
You are the one
Heart so real
I love you so

It takes two to make love
It takes love to make a family real
I got to know what you need
I got to know what you really feel

And I’ve been loving you for so long
You are the one
Heart so real
I love you so
Come on and roll

You know it’s such a pity
If you’re going to get the summertime blues
Lovers everywhere are pairing off two by twos

And I’ve been loving you for so long
You are the one
Heart so real
I love you so

I’ve been loving you for so long
You are the one
Heart so real
I love you so

I’ve got a heart like a wheel
I love you so

I’ve got a heart like a wheel
I’ve got to roll

Tombstone – 1993

I’m always late to the party discovering movies and bands…I saw this movie for the first time last year. I just started to get into westerns in the past couple of years when I discovered “Have Gun Will Travel” and the black and white 30-minute episodes of Gunsmoke.

This is a classic movie. Val Kilmer fan was fantastic in this film. The entire cast did a great job but the way Kilmer portrayed Doc Holliday was iconic. The movie centers around the Earp brothers arriving in Tombstone to make their fortune but they get pulled into fighting the “Cowboys.”

I’m not sure how accurate it is to the real story but its a very entertaining movie nonetheless and I cannot believe I didn’t see this years ago. If you haven’t seen it…make plans to see it. I don’t think you will be disappointed. You will never hear the word “huckleberry” the same again.

The cast included Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer, Sam Elliott, Bill Paxton, Powers Boothe, Michael Biehn, Charlton Heston, Jason Priestly, Jon Tenney, Stephen Lang, Thomas Haden Church, Dana Delany, Paula Malcomson, Lisa Collins, Dana Wheeler-Nicholson, Michael Rooker, Billy Bob Thornton and Billy Zane.

I looked up the Oscars for 1993 and it is a crime that Val Kilmer wasn’t nominated for anything.

The trailer for Tombstone