Who – Getting In Tune

This song was originally on the Who’s Next album released in 1971…my favorite album of that year and maybe of the seventies. That year was an incredible time for albums. Led Zeppelin would release their most remembered album Led Zeppelin IV a few months after Who’s Next.

There is not a bad song on the album. Roger excels on this song and it builds up in the middle for good dynamics. In 2016, Rolling Stone ranked Getting In Tune number 8 on its list of the 50 greatest songs by The Who. Nicky Hopkins plays piano on this song.

The Who’s Next album is one of the most sonic-sounding albums I’ve ever heard. Glyn Johns produced it and said this: “I have a residing memory of sitting in the truck, my hair being parted by what was coming out of the speakers, a massive amount of adrenaline coursing through my veins. There have been a few occasions over the years when I have been completely blown away, believing without a doubt that what I was listening to would become much more than just commercially successful but also a marker in the evolution of popular music, and this was one of those moments.”

Pete Townshend originally wrote this about a character in his “Lifehouse” project, which was going to be a film similar to The Who’s Tommy and Quadrophenia. Townshend never finished “Lifehouse,” but the songs ended up on the great album Who’s Next.

Pete Townshend wrote this as part of his “Lifehouse” project. He wanted to release a film about a futuristic world where the people are enslaved… but saved by a rock concert. Pete couldn’t get enough support to finish the project, but most of the songs he wrote were used on the Who’s Next album.

ARP Synth

Townshend’s use of the ARP synthesizer on Who’s Next was groundbreaking. He didn’t just add texture to it but the ARP became part of the structure of the songs. This was not like today’s synthesizer where you just took it out of the box. It had to be programmed and connected together…and not many people knew how to do it. He took a risk using it because technology in general always moving ahead, Who’s Next could have sounded dated a few years afterward but it still sounds fresh and interesting today…unlike some 1980s synth music.

The album peaked at #4 on the Billboard Album Charts, #1 in the UK, and #5 in Canada in 1971. It also peaked at #7 on the US Billboard Top Pop Catalog in 2014.

Getting In Tune

I’m singing this note ’cause it fits in well with the chords I’m playing
I can’t pretend there’s any meaning hidden in the things I’m saying

But I’m in tune
Right in tune
I’m in tune
And I’m gonna tune
Right in on you
Right in on you
Right in on you

I get a little tired of having to say
“Do you come here often?”
But when I look in your eyes, I see the harmonies
And the heartaches soften

I’m getting in tune
Right in tune
I’m in tune
And I’m gonna tune
Right in on you (right in on you)
Right in on you (right in on you)
Right in on you

I got it all here in my head
There’s nothing more needs to be said
I’m just bangin’ on my old piano
I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow
(Getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
Getting in tune to the straight and narrow
(I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
Yeah, I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow
(I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow)

I’m singing this note ’cause it fits in well with the way I’m feeling
There’s a symphony that I hear in your heart, sets my head a-reeling

But I’m in tune
Right in tune
I’m in tune
And I’m gonna tune
Right in on you (right in on you)
Right in on you (right in on you)
Right in on you

Baby, with you
(Baby, with you)
Baby, with you
(Baby, with you)
Baby, with you

I’ve got it all here in my head
There’s nothing more needs to be said
I’m just bangin’ on my old piano
I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow

Getting in tune to the straight and narrow
I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow
Getting in tune to the straight and narrow
I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow
(Getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
Yeah, I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow
(Getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
Yeah, I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow
(Getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
Yeah, I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow, yeah
(Getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
(Getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
(Getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
(Getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
(I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
Yeah, I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow
(I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow)
(I’m getting in tune to the straight and narrow)

Author: Badfinger (Max)

Power Pop fan, Baseball fan, old movie and tv show fan... and a songwriter, bass and guitar player.

32 thoughts on “Who – Getting In Tune”

  1. It’s my second favorite song on the album. My favorite is Going Mobile, even though some people have told me that it’s the only song on the album that they don’t like, which is totally INSANE.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. No I love Going Mobile… I’m an extreme Moon fan and for me…that song and Bargain are two of his best… Plus who cannot like the line “Play the tape machine, make the toast and tea”

      Like

  2. I like that one, have heard it a few times before. ‘Going Mobile’ is good too- surprised Kingclover knows people who don’t like it (but do like the Who). That is some synth to look at! Wouldn’t be learning to play that one from a three minute Youtube video!

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  3. I have always loved this song. It connected with me even as a kid back when it was released. It was the ‘deep’ lyrics and the pretty melody parts. I didn’t have to wait until I was older to ‘discover’ it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The Who’s Next album is just great…including this song. It did surprise me that it was #8 on the Rolling Stone top 50 Who songs…that is not a knock on the song either…that shows how great it is.

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      1. Its place on the list surprises me too. I don’t think of the RS reviewers as having that good taste, honestly. 😉 And for a band to get its own ‘top 50’ song list, that shows how much they were respected and how prolific they were. It’s incredible. I love the Who’s Next album too.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. After the latest top 500 albums by Rolling Stone…I don’t either. BTW…I STILL havent finished that Jann Wenner book….and I probably never will.
        Yes I’m glad they did pay attention to them anyway.

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      1. lol… Yea they weren’t just a blues hard rock band like Led Zeppelin… there was more sophistication to their songs and albums like Tommy.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Great song from a truly classic album. “Who’s Next” remains my favorite Who album.

    You’re right, there’s no bad track on it. I guess if I had to pick one tune, I’d go with “Won’t Get Fooled Again.”

    The May 1978 live performance of the tune at Shepperton Studios captured for “The Kids Are Alright”, which sadly was Moonie’s last performance, has to be one of the greatest filmed moments in rock & roll.

    Pete Townshend plays like he’s literally possessed. They were all on fire. That performance is just friggin’ unreal!

    Following is a YouTube link. Sorry, I just couldn’t couldn’t resist!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m sure I’ve said this before but “Won’t Get Fooled Again” is the BEST song I ever heard live. It’s made for an arena!
      Oh I love when Pete slid across the stage for THE SHOT of the movie. It only adds to that song…I also love the lasers. I’ve read where he was pissed off at having to play it again for the film…lol hey it worked!

      Have you got The Kids Are Alright?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Exactly, that scene where Towshend is sliding across the stage. To me, this is true rock & roll! It just doesn’t get any better! And, nope, I actually don’t have the movie. Which I realize may sound funny, given how excited I feel about it!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Nice piece Max, the impressive thing about the Moog addition to Who’s Next was that Townshend taught himself how to set it up and utilise it at it’s earliest stage. Glyn John’s ended up just using Townshend’s demos, overdubbing the guitar, drums & bass in the recording sessions.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Townshend’s demos were incredible on their own. He had so much of it worked out.

      I’ll never forget Glyn Johns saying that when he heard Won’t Get Fooled Again through the playback speakers that the sound literally parted his hair.

      Like

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