Rascals – I’ve Been Lonely Too Long

What a great band! I could almost leave it at that and post the song. They were technically the Young Rascals when this song came out of AM radios in the sixties. They were never really an album band but more of a super singles band. The dropped the “young” in 1968 and continued having hits.

The Rascals rose to prominence playing rhythm and blues and soul music. Their 1966 cover of the Rudy Clark and Artie Resnick song…Good Lovin went to the top of the Billboard Pop Singles chart. They had the majority of their hits between 1966-1968.

They had nine top 20 hits and thirteen top 40 hits…they also had three number 1 hits and a total of 18 songs in the Billboard 100 before they disbanded in 1972. This song was written by Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati.

This song was known as I’ve Been Lonely Too Long and Lonely Too Long…it peaked at #16 in the Billboard 100 and #7 in Canada. It was released on January 16, 1967.

They went on to have more hits with “Groovin,” “People Got to Be Free,” “How Can I Be Sure?” and “A Beautiful Morning” before disbanding in 1972.

I’ve Been Lonely Too Long

I’ve been lonely too long, I’ve been lonely too long
In the past it’s come and gone, I feel like I can’t go on without love
I’ve been lonely too long (he’s been lonely too long)
I’ve been lonely too long (he’s been lonely)

As I look back
I can see me lost and searching
Now I find that I can choose, I’m free, oh yeah
So funny I just have to laugh
All my troubles been torn in half
I been lonely too long (he’s been lonely too long)
Lonely too long (he’s been lonely)

In the past it’s come and gone
I feel like I can’t go on without love
(Lonely) lonely too long
I’ve been lonely too long (he’s been lonely)

Just see me now
Makes it worth the time I’ve waited
She was all I need to make me see, oh yeah
I keep hopin’ with all my mind
Everything gonna turn out right
I’ve been lonely too long (he’s been lonely too long)
I’ve been lonely too long (he’s been lonely)

Now look at me
Gliding through this world of beauty
Everything I do brings ecstasy, oh yeah
No wonder I could die
I feel like I’m ’bout ten miles high
I’ve been lonely too long (he’s been lonely too long)
Lonely too long (he’s been lonely)

Found myself somebody (he’s been lonely)
Don’t have to be alone no more (he’s been lonely, he’s been lonely)
Don’t have to alone no more, no more (he’s been lonely, he’s been lonely)

The Young Rascals – Groovin

If I had to pick out favorite cruising songs…this would be in the top 5. A great song by an underappreciated band. This song peaked at #1 in the Billboard 100, #1 in Canada, and #9 in the UK.

This was the second of three #1 hits for The Rascals, after “Good Lovin'” and before “People Got to Be Free.”

The song was off of the album of the same name in 1967 and it peaked at #5 in the Billboard Chart.

From Songfacts

Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati of The Rascals wrote this song after they realized that because of their work schedule, they could see their girlfriends only on Sunday afternoons. It’s implied that these Sunday afternoons are spent with a nice romp. Cavaliere told Seth Swirsky, who was shooting footage for his documentary Beatles Stories, “I met this young girl and I just fell head over heels in love. I was so gone that this joyous, wonderful emotion came into the music. Groovin’ was part of that experience. If you look at the story line, it’s very simple: we’re groovin’ on a Sunday afternoon because Friday and Saturdays are when musicians work. The simplicity of it is that Sundays you could be with your loved one. And the beauty of is this joyous bliss that at that time I equated with a person, but that’s the beauty of music – when it’s an example of what you do it lasts forever. You’re in love forever because of that moment in time that you captured, and that’s what was happening with Groovin’.”

The record company executives who worked on “Groovin'” didn’t particularly like the song, but as they listened to the playback, influential New York DJ Murray the K overheard it and pronounced it a #1 record. Unbeknownst to the group, Murray went to Atlantic Records president Jerry Wexler and demanded it be released. As the program manager and top DJ on the first FM rock station (WOR-FM), Murray the K had this kind of clout, and also the rare ability to connect with listeners and recognize what songs would become hits. The Rascals, who started out as The Young Rascals, were playing at The Gordion Knot club on York Avenue when Murray picked them as his “house band” – the group that backed him up at personal appearances. It was that relationship (based on Murray’s gut sense that the band had genuine potential) that drove his partisan support.

In the US, this spent two weeks at #1, then two weeks at #2 (as Aretha Franklin’s “Respect” took over to top spot), then returned to the top for two more weeks.

The term “Groovy” was becoming popular around this time, and the title of this song is a variation on the term. The first popular “Groovy” song was “A Groovy Kind Of Love,” and the first popular use in lyrics was in “59th Street Bridge Song.”

Smokey Robinson got the idea for his song “Cruisin'” from this one – his original hook was “I love it when we’re groovin’ together,” but he thought “cruisin'” was more intimate.

Groovin

Groovin’, on a Sunday afternoon
Really couldn’t get away too soon

I can’t imagine anything that’s better
The world is ours whenever we’re together
There ain’t a place I’d like to be instead of

Groovin’, down a crowded avenue
Doin’ anything we like to do

There’s always lots of things that we can see
We can be anyone we want to be
And all those happy people we could meet just

Groovin’, on a Sunday afternoon
Really couldn’t get away too soon

Ah-ha-ha
Ah-ha-ha
Ah-ha-ha

We’ll keep on spending sunny days this way
We’re gonna talk and laugh our time away
I feel it comin’ closer day by day
Life would be ecstasy, you and me endlessly

Groovin’, on a Sunday afternoon
Really couldn’t get away too soon

Ah-ha-ha
Ah-ha-ha
Ah-ha-ha

Young Rascals – Good Lovin’

Great song by the Young Rascals and also covered by a number of artists. The song peaked at #1 in the Billboard 100 in 1966. This song was written by Rudy Clark and Arthur Resnick. It was originally recorded in 1965 by The Olympics, a novelty/doo-wop group who had hits with “Peanut Butter,” “Western Movies” and “Hully Gully.”

Felix Cavaliere of The Young Rascals was listening to a New York Soul station when he heard The Olympics version. The Rascals liked it and played a sped-up version at their live performances. They recorded the song for Atlantic Records, and although the group did not like the outcome, famed producer Tom Dowd loved the rawness of it and that version was released, becoming a huge hit.

From Songfacts

The Young Rascals added the famous half spoken/half sung “One! Two! Three!” count-in, which was by Cavaliere.

According to Rolling Stone magazine, The Young Rascals were surprised by the success of this track. Felix Cavaliere admitted, “We weren’t too pleased with our performance. It was a shock to us when it went to the top of the charts.”

This was The Young Rascals first hit. They went on to achieve seven US Top 30 hits before becoming The Rascals in 1968. They disbanded in 1972 after recording five more American Top 30 songs.

Good Lovin

1-2-3-
(Good lovin’ )
(Good lovin’ )
(Good lovin’ )

I was feelin’ so bad,
I asked my family doctor just what I had,
I said, “Doctor,
(Doctor )
Mr. M.D.,
(Doctor )
Now can you tell me, tell me, tell me,
What’s ailin’ me?”
(Doctor )

He said, “Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah,
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah)
Yes, indeed, all you really need
(Is good lovin’)
Gimme that good, good lovin
(Good lovin’)
All I need is lovin’
(Good lovin’)
Good lovin’, baby.

Baby please, squeeze me tight (Squeeze me tight)
Now don’t you want your baby to feel alright? (Feel alright)
I said Baby (Baby) now it’s for sure (it’s for sure)
I got the fever, Baby, Baby, but you’ve got the cure
(You’ve got the cure)

I said, “Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah,
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah)
Yes, indeed, all I really need
(Is good lovin’)
Gimme that good, good lovin
(Good lovin’)
All I need is lovin’
(Good lovin’)
Good lovin’, baby.