Your Mother Should Know

Happy Mothers Day. I’m thinking of my mom today…

Paul said about this song: “I was basically trying to say your mother might know more than you think she does. Give her credit.” He also said that the family atmosphere and his Aunty Jin being there influenced it and its music-hall idea. 

Your Mother Should Know

Let’s all get up and dance to a song
That was a hit before your mother was born
Though she was born a long long time ago
Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Sing it again

Let’s all get up and dance to a song
That was a hit before your mother was born
Though she was born a long long time ago
Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Lift up your hearts and sing me a song
That was a hit before your mother was born
Though she was born a long long time ago
Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Sing it again

Da da dada da da da dada dada dada da da
Da dada da da
Though she was born a long long time ago
Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know

Your mother should know (your mother should)
Your mother should know, yeah

 

 

From Songfacts

As detailed in Beatles In They’re Own Words by Barry Miles, Paul McCartney wrote this at his place on Cavendish Avenue in London on the harmonium in the dining room. His Aunty Jin, Uncle Harry, and other relatives were there, and he just sat and wrote it for a few hours with the door opened so they could all listen from another room. 

This was used in the last scene of the movie Magical Mystery Tour, where the four Beatles dance in tuxedos. Paul McCartney wore a black carnation while the others wore red, fueling rumors that Paul was dead.

Every Mother’s Day, this is still a very popular song. There are surprisingly few contemporary songs with the word “Mother” in the title that are actual tributes to mothers.

The vocals are on the left channel for the first verse, move to the right for the second, then back to the left for the third. The song has an old-fashioned sound to fit with the idea that it’s a favorite of a past generation.